James and Tammy King


Please view my property listings below.
$49,200,000  •  32,800 acres
Ford Ranch, with over 100 years of excellent land management practices, is the magazine cover photo of Hill Country beauty with rolling grasslands painted in blue bonnets, huge century oaks and mesquites, abundant wildlife and healthy livestock.
$149,490,000  •  196,000 acres
Dove Mountain offers a variety of habitats and improvements which start on the north at Tres Hermanos summit on the Shely Peaks at 5,210 feet down into a wide scenic valley where you find the live water section of San Francisco Creek that is cottonwood lined for over two miles. An airstrip and giant hanger. The Pine Mountains where there are some of the most majestic overlooks in the entire region. Pinion pine found on the north slope and above on the Mesa and within the canyons provide habitat for an Elk herd that can be seen regularly. If there is one thing that makes this ranch stand out is the availability of Desert Big Horn Sheep habitats as well as the availability of permits by TPWD.
$40,317,050  •  52,022 acres
YE Mesa Ranch is as beautiful and rugged as it gets in the Big Bend County with an excellent road system accessing valleys, mountains and canyons throughout. The spine of the Santiago Mountains is the western boundary on the north ranch but cuts across the south ranch creating a series of ridges and valleys and outstanding views. Connected to the west side of the Santiago Mountains is YE Mesa itself with a raised volcanic uplift and peak slopping off toward Chalk Draw just off the ranch. There are numerous commanding vistas of the entire Big Bend Region and its mountain features including El Pico in the Del Carmens and the entire Chiosos Mountain skyline.
$28,151,475  •  34,123 acres
Horse Mountain Ranch is located just a 30-minute drive from the Gage Hotel in Marathon, which serves as the gateway to Big Bend Nation Park to the south. Horse Mountain Ranch is divided into two contiguous historical ownerships with the north portion being a wide valley between the Pena Blanca Mountains, Horse Mountain and Twin Peaks creating an expanse called Lightning Flat where the headwaters of Horse Draw and Pena Blanca Draw are located. The Headquarters is located on the north unit adjacent to the Historic Reed Spring which makes a beautiful cottonwood tree lined lake.
$7,500,000  •  12,000 acres
The Farmer Ranch is one of the original farming operations developed in the Van Horn area is now a working cattle and hunting ranch set within the vast scenic landscape of far-west Texas. The majority of the ranch consists of gently rolling high-desert grasslands, draws and flats with spectacular views of the towering area mountains, providing for excellent hunting opportunities.
$4,750,000  •  202 acres
The Jenschke Lane Farm is large and diverse enough to give a sense of privacy while also providing excellent access, multiple home sites with incredible views, and a fantastic location amidst this booming region of the Hill Country. The farm primarily consists of gently rolling savanna-woodlands studded with huge Post Oaks and Spanish Oaks with areas of historic and active cultivation nestled into the picturesque Hill Country farm scenery.
$24,000,000  •  10,000 acres
Cathedral Mountain Ranch 10,000 acres only 13.5 miles south of Alpine on highway 118. Iconic ranch with 5.3 miles both sides of spring-fed Calamity Creek. The Ranch has a 3,000 sf owners Lodge set up facing south framing Cathedral Mountain, a 3-bedroom 2 bath foreman’s home, large stocked lake, trees, rock outcrops, and elevations up to 6,868 feet. Rare opportunity. Co-Listed with Carpenter Real Estate.
$3,149,304  •  7,410.13 acres
H Bar H is predominantly within the Bear Canyon drainage with steep hills, cliffs, and drainage along with grass covered flats. A road system gets you down to the river and around the ranch making this place private and extremely accessible. Seven wells with several watering troughs provide amazing water distribution for wildlife. The headquarters is a compound with an updated 3 bedroom/2 bath main house with a custom rock fireplace, hunter’s camp, barns and outbuilding.
$15,554,171  •  19,814 acres
Tesnus Ranch is a cattle and hunting recreation ranch with an amazing amount of seclusion framed between towering mountains all within diverse low, mid to high desert habitats. An excellent all-weather caliche road provides access into the ranch where near the entrance there is a very nice modern 3-bedroom 2-bath Headquarters home.
$875,000  •  9.24 acres
Located on the south slope of Sleeping Lion Mountain this 2 bedroom+den, 1.5 bath historic 2,050 +/- square foot adobe home with 1 bedroom, 1 bath casita has been renovated for modern living. Period architectural details abound. Outdoor dining areas and porches are located among the boulders and native plant landscaping.
$85,995,000  •  117,000 acres
Classic “Big Bend Country” of the Old West, Rio Texico Ranch has maintained much of the environment and appearance of times past. Rio Texico Ranch's San Francisco Creek is a year-round live water with Cottonwood gallery forests on both banks and riparian vegetation are very rare in this desert and a magnet for wildlife. The ranch is a working cattle ranch with some excellent recently improved infrastructure. There are miles of new internal fences, pens, and traps as well as water and road improvements.
$14,300,000  •  1,508 acres
Gallagher Headquarters Ranch, a world unto itself, spans 1,508 acres of lush Hill Country mountains, clear ambling San Geronimo Creek with its deep lakes and limestone bed shoals, ancient signature Live Oaks, and one of the most historic and well restored headquarters in Texas.
$439,855  •  1,313 acres
North Cedar Creek Ranch fronts on the south side of US Highway 90 for 1.2 miles just 8 miles east of Dryden, Texas between Del Rio and Alpine. With high rolling limestone hills overlooking diverse habitat along the creek bottoms, North Cedar Creek Ranch abounds with hunting and recreation.
$3,212,140  •  6,004 acres
Dos Lomas Ranch is located between Ft. Stockton and Ozona fronting for over 5 miles on the north side of Interstate 10 and its frontage road at Exit 314 just 10 miles as the crow flies south west of Iraan. San Antonio is just 3.5 hours to the east making this an excellent weekend recreation ranch. Acreage 6,004 +/- Acres in Pecos County The name of the ranch comes from two high limestone mountain tops that dominate the views from around the ranch. Broad tops with big valleys creates a combination of easy accessible gentle land with deeper soil and the limestone bluffs, rim country, steep hills, and canyon heads creating a diversity of habitats and landforms. This is a working ranch with exceptional hunting. It’s also loaded with canyons, mountains, caves, and excellent vegetation cover making this a hiker and explorers dream. It has been well managed for decades and is known for its combination of native grass, shrubs, and trees. A combination of three large pastures and two traps with pens and extensive water infrastructure complete this working ranch. Some call this “divide country” as the ranch has tremendous topography with a road infrastructure that allows easy access up on top and across the entire ranch. Flay grassy mesa tops with a natural Playa Lake or “Buffalo Wallow” contrast with the rim rock canyons, broad valleys, wooded steep limestone bluffs. This is Western Edwards Plateau transitioning into the Chihuahuan Deseret a convergence of two biologically-distinct eco-regions in Texas. Dos Lomas is the perfect combination of topography, vegetation, accessibility, scenery, history and romance. The Headquarters is simple but functional with a foreman’s house and owner/hunter camp house. The old historic house burned many years ago but there is an excellent location to build a new owners lodge. There are some outbuildings, barns and pens located at the Headquarters. The owners have worked for decades with the NRCS in cost share programs to improve rangeland and building new fences within the ranch. From yucca and sotol, to hackberry and mesquite woodlands, to persimmon and juniper, the ranch represents a crossroads of diverse habitats. The property’s browse and grasslands are in great condition, a result of responsible grazing methods. Native grasses, forbs, browse, brush, cacti and trees not only provide excellent habitat for gamespecies such as deer, turkey, quail, and dove, but also for non-game species such as Texas horned lizard, neotropical songbirds, fox, ringtail cat, and many other animals.Mule deer, and whitetail deer populations on the Ranch are great. The population is about 50/50 for the two deer types and, within the steep terrain along the canyons, one can also find Aoudad sheep. Wing shooting opportunities for blue quail and mourning dove are tremendous. The ranch has a MLD Level II permit and has been carefully managed over the decades by responsible hunters. The ranch is divided into upper mesa land and lower valley/canyon land. There are 3 wells below the rim with one being a windmill and the other two being submersible with electricity. The submersible in West Pasture is pumped up the rim and supplies water on top. There is also a Windmill on top in the East Pasture. The water is shallow, accessible, prolific, and is high quality, being part of the Edwards-Trinity or Plateau Aquifer. The three wells below the rim are 300 feet in depth with water at 120 feet and the one windmill on top is 600 feet deep. Storage tanks and troughs distribute water around each pasture and at the Headquarters. One water through on top near the pens is supplied by a neighbor’s well. This ranch is adjacent to the Yates Field one of the most prolific Oil Fields in the World which has produced over one Billion Barrels of Oil. There are no active wells or leases on the Dos Lomas Ranch. There are three Mineral Classified Sections and the Sellers will convey 10% of fee minerals owned. The fee minerals conveyed will allow any future surface owner to provide for Surface Protection provisions in any new Lease. There is a 137 KV Transmission Line across the west end of the ranch from the Interstate up and out the top of the ranch. The owners have had interest from both Solar and Wind developers in the past. They will convey all Solar and Wind rights.
$6,900,000  •  13,468 acres
Alpine High Ranch represents a diverse landscape of deep bottom soils along the draw that carries the ranch name; broad gravelly flats, up into limestone hills with commanding views of many of the area mountain ranges, including the Del Norte, Glass, and Davis mountains. This cow country hunting ranch is very accessible, yet you can hide away in the many interesting secret draws and cover where you will find abundant populations of desert Mule Deer, Elk, dove, and the wily Blue Quail. The ranch has a tremendous road infrastructure and, with just a corner of the ranch located along Highway 67, it is very private but extremely accessible. The topography of the ranch is a broad open valley with several limestone hills, cut by broad wooded draws and elevations ranging from 3,500 feet to 3,100 feet, which makes for a wide variety of soils and a very interesting mix of habitats. The ranch to the south has several center pivot irrigation fields right up to the fence-line, accessing the same aquifer under this ranch, the Hovey Channel. There are several areas where this could be replicated along Coyanosa Draw as there is a huge amount of relatively shallow fresh water, with deep soils. The ranch has a number of windmills and solar wells. Electricity is located at the southwest corner and an excellent submersible water pump produces from only 220 feet. There are several dirt tanks on the ranch with room for many more. Monsoon rains come in the summers, providing for an excellent growing season of a wide variety of Chihuahuan Desert plants, shrubs, and grasses. There is an extensive road network on the ranch and the exterior fences range from new to functional. Several caliche gravel pits will provide significant materials for future needs. The owners have built extensive all-weather caliche roads. There is a great metal barn, as well as a set of pens and a historic rock ruin, and many places to build a new lodge or headquarters. The landscape consists of one-half foothills to the Glass Mountains and the other half deep-soil bottom land. This ranch lies at an elevation that supports a mix of vegetation from the mid-Chihuahuan Desert such as century plants, Spanish dagger, yucca, agarita, sotol and cholla, with a dominant gramma grass mix and scattered bush/trees, including creosote, mesquite, hackberry, and soap berry. Native grasslands provide excellent forage for livestock as well as habitat for Mule Deer and native birds and mammals. The ranch also has several ridges and hills rich in a diversity of rocks and minerals, including many types of agates. The ranch lies over a tremendous freshwater aquifer, both shallow and deep. There are three windmills, one solar pump, two generator pumps, and one electric submersible. Water is distributed to several storage tanks and water troughs for wildlife and livestock. Development of irrigated alfalfa and other wildlife forage could greatly enhance the Deer and Elk populations. The water and soils are there, and with gas wells on the ranch, natural gas pumps could provide the energy needed to develop the irrigated cropland component.
$3,648,000  •  7,296 acres
Situated at the convergence of three biologically-distinct eco-regions in Texas; the Texas Hill Country to the east, the Chihuahuan Desert to the west, and the subtropical Tamaulipan Brushland to the south, creating one of the most unique wildlife habitats in the state.
$7,695,620  •  22,972 acres
The ranch is situated at the convergence of three biologically-distinct eco-regions in Texas; the Texas Hill Country to the east, the Chihuahuan Desert to the west, and the subtropical Tamaulipan Brushland to the south, creating one of the most unique wildlife habitats in the state.
$5,709,951  •  8,459 acres
The 8,459+/- acre Pecos Canyon Ranch is dominated by the river and the canyonlands that drain into it. It is really two ranches, split by the county road, with excellent new fences and entrance gates for privacy and security.
$4,266,000  •  10,800 acres
This is Western Hill Country and rugged Canyon Country at its finest. An area filled with history and amazing natural habitat and wildlife. Meyers Canyon was named for one of the black Seminole soldiers who served under Lt. John L. Bullis and who lived at Fort Meyers on the bank of the canyon. In the late 1870s and early 1880s, Black Seminole scouts, who were known as the Black Watch, occupied the small outpost called Fort Meyers, which was located above the canyon downstream from Rainbow Ranch. Prehistoric people lived in the limestone caves before that time in natural rockshelters along the main and side canyons where they left middens, fire-blackened cave walls, rock art and artifacts. Sixteenth-century Comanches raided across the Rio Grande into this same country, leaving more pronounced black images including those of Spanish Settlers. Rainbow Ranch was assembled by the current family of owners, starting in 1991 and today is a solid 10,800 acre block of rolling hills and huge limestone canyons with a diverse assemblage of native vegetation. The ranch is situated at the convergence of three biologically-distinct eco-regions in Texas; the Texas Hill Country to the east, the Chihuahuan Desert to the west, and the subtropical Tamaulipan Brushland to the south, creating one of the most unique wildlife habitats in the state. The north/south orientation of Highway 349 allows several entrances to different parts of the ranch and into a network of roads allowing access to both sides of the major canyons and along several internal smaller canyons and ridgetops. This is not flat Plateau country with dissected canyons, but rather an extensive landscape of rolling hills, valleys and long canyons creating very scenic and amazingly beautiful views. There are very few improvements on the ranch outside the two primitive hunting camps; roads, working windmills, and old ranching facilities. With topography ranging from just below 2,000 to over 2,400 feet there are many building sites with distant views or vistas of sheer wall canyons.
$2,518,550  •  2,963 acres
Eagle Piñon Ranch sits on the southeast shoulder of the Eagle Mountains and was a pasture at one time in a much larger ownership named Piñon Pasture after the extensive Mexican Piñons found on this ranch. Just nine miles west of Van Horn is the Allamoore exit on I-10
$3,315,768  •  1,381 acres
Location Panther Rock Ranch is part of the historic Woodward Ranch and is comprised of 1,381 acres located on the banks of year-round Ash Creek on the east side of Highway 118 south of Alpine and has been visited by Big Bend travelers and rock hounds from all over the world. The ranch fronts on the east side of Highway 118 just 15 miles south of Alpine starting at the roadside picnic area and runs south for over a mile. Panther Rock Ranch is the gateway into the Big Bend Country with its over 1,000,000 acres of parks and public lands and is an hour’s drive north of Lajitas and Terlingua and their outdoor adventures and amenities. Cathedral Mountain (6,860 feet), one of the area's iconic peaks, towers over the ranch to the west and Elephant Mountain Wildlife Management Area is just to the south waiting to be explored. With elevations between 4,736 and 5,021 feet, at the ranch you are in one of the best year-round climates in the state and arguably the entire country. Acreage 1,381 acres in Brewster County. Description Famous for its unique red plume agate as well as black plume, golden plume, opal, and over 50 other kinds of agates and gemstones, the Woodward Ranch has a history of visitors who are rock collectors, nature lovers, hunters, hikers, birders, or just folks wanting to get away from it all. This eastern 1,381 acre part of the original ranch has a main gate fronting on Highway 118 and beautiful Ash Creek cutting through the middle for over a mile creating lush meadows and two large mountains. This is high Chihuahuan Desert grasslands and riparian woodlands studded with interesting outcrops of rocks and large trees, creating a scenic wonderland. The ranch has an old building site with amazing views toward Elephant Mountain and down Calamity Creek and over to Cathedral Mountain towering over the landscape. There is a road network that circles the ranch crossing the Arizona Ash lined creek with adjacent meadows meandering around prominent hills with landscape views of area mountains. Panther Rock Ranch is surrounded by large ranches in stable ownerships with no threat of development. The perfect ranch neighborhood!! Habitat Panther Rock Ranch is dominated by mile-high grasslands of Cane Bluestem, Blue Gramma, and Sideoats Gramma with rhyolite palisades mountains studded with Juniper, Emory and Grey Oaks. Excellent grasses and Chihuahuan Desert plants provide habitat for the native animals, livestock and the people who live there. Ash Creek has numerous stands of large Emory Oaks, Cottonwoods, Arizona Ash, Desert Willow, and other riparian vegetation. This diversity of plants especially near and around the springs and riparian areas are unequaled in the Trans Pecos Region. This is historic ranching country and represents some of the best cow/calf range in West Texas. Wildlife Because of the diverse habitat with springs, creeks, boulders, trees, grasses, and mountains there is an abundance of game and non-game animals and wildlife on Panther Rock Ranch. This is big mule deer and whitetail deer country with lots of blue quail, mourning dove, and Rio Grande turkey, making this a hunter’s paradise. There are also smaller animal and bird species found here like javelina, fox, ringtail, mountain lion, hawks, hummingbirds, Montezuma quail, and a variety of neotropical songbirds. Native trees, brush, and grasses provide excellent habitat for these species and many native birds and other non-game animals. Wooded wet canyons and lush grasslands provide excellent habitat for migratory songbirds. Improvements The old home site just off Highway 118 is an excellent building area for the next owner. It has electricity and an older water well which, if put back in service, would supply water to this elevated lookout. There is a road system through the ranch and up into the hills and another water well on the east side of the ranch that once supplied water to that end of the ranch. There is an old shed and pens near the old home site. Water Woodward Ranch has abundant groundwater and a rare live creek called Ash Creek running for over a mile through the middle of the ranch as well as several year round springs. There are 3 working solar wells on Panther Rock Ranch, two of which are new, ranging in depth from 100 feet to 330 feet. The ranch also has 12.5 ac feet of adjudicated water rights from the State of Texas from Ash Creek.
King Land & Water

James and Tammy King
PO Box 109
Fort Davis, TX 79734

Office: 4324262024
Website