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$2,735,000  •  2,735,000 acres
The Double Mustang is a classic South Texas hunting property, located in an area known for trophy whitetails. Blinds and feeders will convey, and you can be hunting this season. An added bonus are the tremendous numbers of arrowheads to be found on this ranch. Location: Situated between Highway 44 and the Nueces River, the ranch is approximately 20 miles west of Freer and 30 miles east of Encinal in northeastern Webb County. Habitat: The western portion of this ranch is gently rolling mesquite and grass country. As you travel into the eastern portion, there is more relief and heavier, diverse, South Texas browse. Numerous tanks are dispersed across the ranch, and there is a water well that has not been equipped with a pump that could provide supplemental water. A good system of roads and senderos provides access and shooting lanes across the property. Wildlife: The ranch has been high fenced for many years, and improved genetics were introduced several years ago. Per ownership, harvest has been limited to cull and management deer for several years. Game on the ranch consists of deer, a few hogs and javelina. The ranch has not been grazed in many years, and the grass and quail populations show it. A nice mix of bobwhite and blue quail are found on the ranch. Other: Included in the offering are nine quality tower blinds, corn and protein feeders, two storage containers, and an equipment shed. Asking Price: $2,735,000 ($1,689/acre).
$16,500,000  •  500,000 acres
AMERICA'S WESTERNMOST RANCH DOES NOT LIE ALONG THE SLOPES OF A REMOTE MOUNTAIN RANGE, NOR UNDER A BONE-BLEACHING DESERT SUN, NOR ON A TROPICAL BEACH. Instead, the massive ranch lies northwest of the contiguous United States and Hawaii, clinging to the heart of the Cradle of Storms, as locals call this region of Alaska. Resembling a strand of emeralds set against a steely gray sea, the Aleutian Islands reach for Asia with the snow-capped peaks of dozens of volcanoes peppered by the domes of small Russian Orthodox churches. The jagged islands separate the frigid waters of the Bering Sea from the relatively warm waters of the Pacific with its Kuroshio current. The mixing of these waters gives birth to some of the most violent storms recorded in North America, often draping this world in fog for weeks and keeping the lush grasslands of these islands green. The 686-square-mile Umnak Island is just west of Dutch Harbor. Seventy-two miles long and 16 miles wide with a volcano of its own, the island is also the home of the nearly 500,000-acre Bering Pacific Ranches with its 10,000 head of cattle. There are about 10,000 reindeer, a small bison herd on the far end of the island, and a few wild horses. The Okmok volcano and other mountains in the center of Umnak Island separate the ranch from the village a little more than 40 miles away. The ranch house, housing for cowboys, slaughterhouse, and pens were originally part of Fort Glenn, a World War II Army air base that was effectively abandoned a few years after the Japanese surrendered. The slaughter plant was built up from the concrete foundation of one of the military structures. The site is leased from the Alaska Department of Transportation, and grazing rights for the ranch are leased from Native corporations that own land on the island. The ranch maintains a small herd of 11 saddle horses, but the real work bringing in the cattle is done with a two-seat helicopter. With stock ranging 50 miles or more from the pens, The ranch found horses to be impractical across such distances of rough terrain. The helicopter is ideal for working the valleys, driving the animals out toward the holding pens. The ranch becomes fully operational in the fall months, each season processing 500 to 1,000 head with 40 to 60 head per day after the cattle have been rounded into pens following a summer spent fattening up. Umnak Island and Unalaska Island, Alaska 200,000 Acres under grazing lease (4 Separate Leases) Year round carrying capacity of 8,000 to 10,000 head without supplementation Current Herd - 10,000 Head Other Assets: - USDA / Oregon Tilth Certified Organic Slaughter Facility - Ranch Headquarters Building - 3 Cabins - Shop and Hanger - R22 Beta Helicopter - Misc Ranch Equipment, Trucks, Tractors, etc. Please contact Icon Global Group for more details.
$324,360,000  •  424,000 acres
An assemblage of 7 ranches making up 424,000± acres that include some of the most amazing land features found in the Southwest, located in Brewster County, TX. The vast landscape comes a diversity of habitats and a rich population of native wildlife. Desert big horn sheep permits are given each year by Texas Parks and Wildlife to hunt the sustainable population of the Desert Big Horn Sheep.
$92,139,660  •  120,444 acres
Dagger Flats Ranch has a variety of habitats and improvements. The headquarters is an elaborate assemblage of homes, barns, and building all looking north at the beautiful mountains on the ranch. The ranch has a live water section of San Francisco Creek that is cottonwood lined for over five miles. The ranch is a working cattle and hunting ranch with Elk, Mule deer Desert Big Horn Sheep habitats as well as the availability of permits by TPWD.
$96,091,250  •  113,650 acres
The Y-6 Ranch, near Valentine, TX, is rich in ranching history and ranching heritage. Mountains, grasslands, springs, canyons, and desert habitat creates one of the best hunting and wildlife ranches in Texas. With abundant wildlife, such as mule deer, herds of pronghorn, white-tail deer, mountain lion, occasional elk can all be found here. Smaller animal and bird species found on the ranch includes javelina, fox, ringtail cat, coyote, dove, Gamble’s quail and many, many large coveys of blue or scaled quail. The ranch can be divided and sold into two parts or sold as an entire ranch.
$14,900,000  •  112,097 acres
Bitter Creek Ranch is a generational ranch full of Western and Native American history. The ranch is an exceptional mix of recreation and cattle grazing opportunities. A hunter or cowboy’s dream, this contiguous ranch runs 800 AUs on 112,097± total acres with 11,037± deeded acres, 90,000± acres BLM lease, 5,080± acres leased Utah State land, and 5,980± acres open grazing land. An oasis located entirely in Game Management Unit 21 where 200- inch bucks and 400-inch bulls are not uncommon. Truly a year-round ranch covering elevations of 5,200 feet up to 9,000 feet at the top. Over 300 acres of flood-irrigated pastures and a variety of sub-irrigated meadows are located along seven miles of Bitter Creek, which flows through the heart of the summer country, filling six trout ponds. In the spring, the acreage is seasonally irrigated from Evacuation Creek and numerous free-flowing springs. The lower elevation portions of the ranch provide forage through the winter. The ranch has six homes of various sizes, three in the winter country and three nestled in the secluded mountains of the summer country. Additional improvements include a hunting outfitter’s bunkhouse and headquarters near the privately owned McAndrews Lake, various outbuildings, storage sheds and strategically located corrals, working facilities, and holding pens. There are four water wells on the private land and three artesian wells on BLM land. The Facts: ~ 110,537± acres total with 11,037± acres deeded ~ Trophy mule deer and elk genetics ~ Additional hunting for black bear, mountain lion, and turkey ~ Fishing for various types of trout in the numerous ponds ~ Owner rated carrying capacity of 800 mother cows year-round ~ Great winter range ranch because of very good protection ~ Four sets of working facilities ~ Six homes on the ranch and various outbuildings ~ Strategically located corrals and working facilities
$80,131,230  •  102,078 acres
Dove Mountain Ranch is a massive contiguous cattle and hunting ranch is at the gateway to Big Bend National Park to the south and is home to a wide array of natural features. If there is one thing that makes this ranch stand out is the availability of Desert Big Horn Sheep habitats as well as the availability of permits by TPWD.
$66,421,150  •  95,570 acres
Classic “Big Bend Country” of the Old West, Rio Texico Ranch has maintained much of the environment and appearance of times past. Rio Texico Ranch's San Francisco Creek is year-round live water with Cottonwood gallery forests on both banks. and riparian vegetation are very rare in this desert and a magnet for wildlife. The ranch is a working cattle ranch with some excellent recently improved infrastructure. There are miles of new internal fences, pens, and traps as well as water and road improvements.
$136,250,000  •  79,582 acres
Under Contract
One of the most historically-significant land and cattle empires in the Rocky Mountain West, Climbing Arrow Ranch consists of approximately 79,582 acres, of which about 73,180 are deeded. CA Ranch has a long, storied history of agricultural production, with a cow herd of nearly 2,000 commercial Black Angus cattle and productive irrigated hay meadows along the famed Madison River. Teeming with German browns, cutthroat and rainbow trout, fly fishing on the CA is legendary. The pristine trout waters of the North Fork, Middle Fork and the main channel of Sixteenmile Creek serpentine through the Francis Unit for over 17 miles, and nearly 3.5 miles of the acclaimed Madison River form the western edge of the Valley Unit, creating a private fishing experience like no other in Montana. World-renowned elk hunting exists on the Francis Unit which is home to an elk herd of 900 to 1,500, and attracts dozens of magnum bulls scoring in the 350 to 370 class with larger bulls harvested in the 390 range. Held in the same family for the past 62 years, ranches of this scope--with large-scale agricultural production, unrivaled big-game hunting and private fishing waters, in one of the most desirable locales in Rocky Mountains--are peerless in today’s western land market.