Advanced Filters
Reduced
$58,000,000  •  59,889 acres
$69,500,000
The IX Ranch is a legacy ranch – it is huge, has a long history of stable ownership and a respected reputation in reputation ranch country. Its central Montana location is 80 miles northeast of Great Falls and adjacent to the town of Big Sandy. The current owners are the second owners in the ranch’s 128-year history. This professionally managed operation runs a cattle herd of 4,300. They currently winter around 3,375 bred females, 120 3-year-and-younger bulls and ranch horses, together with 4,000 tons of winter feed. In the spring, around 650 of the previous years’ heifer calves will return to the ranch for breeding from a grow-lot near Billings. The operation covers over 126,305± acres, of which 59,889± is deeded and the majority of the balance being State grazing leases. It is well improved, with accommodations for a full crew including a manager, as well as comfortable quarters for guests. Besides its position as one of Montana’s great cattle ranches, the IX boasts large populations of elk, mule deer, whitetail deer, antelope, mountain lion, and five species of upland birds. It is also a scenic ranch boasting a diversity of habitat types from productive meadows to rolling hills which give way to steeper mountain country with scatterings of aspens and evergreens.
$19,000,000  •  58,613 acres
LONE CROW CATTLE RANCH – Converse & Niobrara Counties, Douglas, Wyoming: The Lone Crow Cattle Ranch is located in the Thunder Basin Grassland approximately 70 miles northeast of Douglas, Wyoming, and 58 miles northwest of Lusk, Wyoming. This large, low-overhead grass ranch is easily-accessible year-round via well-maintained graveled county roads. The ranch consists of 34,141+ deeded acres, 3,200 acres State of Wyoming lease, 10,420 acres of Thunder Basin Grazing Association permit and 10,852± BLM lease acres for a total of 58,613+ acres. Historically, the Lone Crow Cattle Ranch has been used as a year-round cow/calf operation. The ranch is owner-rated for an average of 1,200 pairs plus bulls and ranch horses. Six solar wells, six submersible wells, several windmills, and several reservoirs along with seasonal water from Snyder Creek, Spring Creek and West Bull Creek provide additional water for livestock and wildlife. To maximize grazing, over 20 miles of underground pipeline provides water to stock water tanks strategically located throughout the ranch. Improvements include five houses, shops, storage buildings, barns, several additional livestock sheds and other outbuildings, and three sets of working corrals. The Lone Crow Cattle Ranch a superb, low-overhead grass ranch with extensive variety of wildlife that includes mule deer, whitetail deer, antelope, elk, wild turkeys, and a several species of small game. Price: $19,000,000 Contact Clark & Associates Land Brokers, LLC at (307) 334-2025 for more details.
$2,900,000  •  58,561 acres
850 head ranch Coconino County, AZ
$17,500,000  •  58,154 acres
Located in Northern California’s San Benito & Fresno Counties, Ashurst is just 60 miles from Hollister and a 100 miles from San Jose California. Encompassing a massive 27,944 deeded acres with a BLM allotment of 30,210 acres, this property is immense. The ranch supports 4,500 head and most recently, 5,100 head of mix cows and feeders. Headquarters include multiple homes, shops, barns, and livestock support equipment. Water throughout Ashurst comes from several ponds, some seasonal and spring fed. An extensive water system with storage tanks, troughs, springs and small wells, provide livestock and domestic water for the ranch. There are nine oil wells on the property providing oil well income. In addition to the cattle operation, the ranch has outstanding hunting with elk, pigs and deer. * Co-listed with Cushman & Wakefield*
$100,000,000  •  56,050 acres
Located in northwest Colorado, the 56,050 +/- deeded acre Cross Mountain Ranch represents one of the largest and most diverse recreational and operating ranches on the market today. A wildlife preserve stretching over four counties and 168,000+/- acres of leased National Forest, BLM, State and Park Service lands, the ranch is home to North Americas largest elk herd. It is an ecologically diverse landscape with several miles of river frontage on the Yampa, Little Snake and Williams Fork Rivers and numerous other streams, lakes and ponds. With valuable and historic water rights and within forty-five minutes from the resort town of Steamboat Springs and twenty minutes from a commercial airport, Cross Mountain Ranch is an incredible legacy ranch and investment opportunity. Contact Ken Mirr.
Reduced
$17,500,000  •  52,445 acres
$20,000,000
McEwen Ranch and Cattle CompanyWith roots in the Miller-Lux cattle empire of the 19th century, this expansive cattle and hay operation encompasses 52,445± deeded acres in the Malheur River basin of eastern Oregon near the small ranching community of Crane, an hour southeast of Burns. With an emphasis on premium beef production, the ranch currently runs 1,225± breeding cows plus bulls with capacity for 1,525± cows and produces excess hay on 1,500± acres, including 1,125± acres under 9 Valley and Zimmatic center pivots. Abundant water features and improvements include reservoirs, year-round creeks and streams, irrigation and stock-water wells, springs, ponds, playas, and range developments. The ranch is modestly but practically improved with employee housing, equipment storage, barns, shop buildings, and cattle facilities, including a 750-head permitted backgrounding lot. The ranch is home to an array of western wildlife, and the owner is eligible to receive up to eight landowner preference tags to hunt elk and deer on the ranch. There are also strong populations of chukar and California quail, and the reservoirs offer excellent largemouth bass fishing. Hall and Hall's management division has provided professional oversight of the ranch since 2008 and is available to work on behalf of a new owner to manage the ranch under a long-term arrangement or as part of a transition strategy. Situated in the heart of Oregon's high desert, McEwen Ranch and Cattle Company is a profitable legacy ranch that represents one of the largest deeded properties available in the West today.The Facts:Large, profitable cattle and hay ranch in eastern Oregon one hour southeast of BurnsEncompassing 52,445± deeded acres with adjoining BLM grazing allotmentsRunning 1,225± cows plus bulls with capacity for 1,525± cows Producing excess hay on 1,500± acres, including 1,125± acres under nine center pivotsNumerous water features and improvements providing abundant water for irrigation, livestock, wildlife, and recreationModest but practical livestock and ranch facilitiesExcellent big game hunting, wing shooting, and largemouth bass fishingYear-round access on paved highways and good gravel roadsAnnual property taxes are approximately $20,000This offering involves the sale of the surface rights to the ranch only. Mineral rights to be reserved by the seller at closing.Cattle, hay, and machinery are not included in the offering price but available for purchase
$72,000,000  •  50,500 acres
The iconic N3 Cattle Company is on the market for the first time in 85 years. This beautiful and expansive California property spans 50,500 acres through four counties, making it the largest land offering in the State of California. Located just south of Livermore, and east of Oakland and San Jose, it is easily accessed from San Francisco, the Peninsula and the East Bay. The Ranch is completely private and uniquely preserved, healthy and wild as it has been for hundreds of years. It is a vital and rare haven of original California landscape and wildlife. The property encompasses 80 square miles of diverse terrains, flora, fauna, and important watersheds and creeks. N3 has been a working cattle ranch for 85 years and offers a rare look at a way of life quickly disappearing. Sprinkled with a dozen rustic cabins, the ranch also hosts one of the most famous, sustainable hunting operations in the state. Its owners are fourth-generation ranchers and are respected members of the ranching community. The ranch is enrolled in the Williamson Act and has no conservation easements.
$25,000,000  •  49,500 acres
The OW Ranch is the original headquarters of the Kendrick Cattle Company, perhaps the most famous of the cattle empires in the Sheridan area and now one of the best values for a low overhead ranch on the market today.
Contact for Price  •  47,737 acres
Located in Northeast Nevada, the Independence Valley Farm & Ranch (IVF&R) is a spectacular property with endless natural re- sources. Currently operating as a farm and cattle ranch, it includes over 47,700 deeded acres with an adjacent BLM grazing allotment of more than 100,000 acres. This property has incredible potential for development of oil, gold, and geothermal opportunities, in addition to it’s farming and ranching operations. The expansive vistas of high mountain basins, covered in an abundance of wheat grass, and seemingly endless landscape best describe this property as immense. This property is being offered at appraised value with a complete and comprehensive valuation analysis available to qualified buyer(s) for review.
$22,080,684  •  46,485.65 acres
About an hour’s drive west of Albuquerque, N.M., the Lobo Ranch spreads across 46,485± deeded acres of stunningly beautiful landscape marked by large mesas, rock formations, sandstone bluffs, expansive grasslands and open valleys. This working cattle ranch has outstanding recreational and historical attributes, including abundant wildlife and plentiful habitat, and hundreds of archeological sites and ancient petroglyphs. With elevations that range from approximately 6,100 feet to more than 8,200 feet above sea level, the ranch encompasses several distinct ecosystems that are home to a variety of wildlife from Rocky Mountain Elk, mule deer and Barbary sheep to black bears, mountain lions, quail, turkey and upland birds. Seasonal pastures with excellent winter range along the southern and eastern valley slopes favor both cattle and elk. The current owner grazes approximately 300 animal units in an operation that is biased toward wildlife and range preservation. Improvements include a 3,700-square-foot guest lodge with a large porch and patio with outdoor fireplace, a bunkhouse, manager’s residence, barns, equipment shop and a helicopter hanger. The ranch is accessible year-round via Cibola County Road 1, a county-maintained gravel road, north of Interstate 40 at the Laguna Interchange. The Facts • 46,485± deeded acres adjacent to the Marquez Wildlife Area • 55 miles west of Albuquerque, N.M. • Slightly more than an hour from Sunport, Albuquerque’s International Airport • 53 miles from Grants, N.M., and Grants Municipal Airport • Located on Cibola County Road 1, 15 miles north of Interstate 40 at the Laguna Interchange • Elevation 6,100 ft to 8,200 ft above sea level • Situated in Cibola (95%) and Sandoval Counties Improvements • The Lodge, 3,700± s.f. with 4 bedrooms, 3 baths • The Bunkhouse, 1,512± s.f. with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths • Manager’s residence, Modular home with 2 bedrooms, 1 bath • Equipment Shop, 3,000± s.f. • Hay Barn, 3,900± s.f. • Helicopter hangar, 40’ x 50’ • Horse barn, 1,120± s.f. Water • 20 water wells, including 4 solar powered pumps (quarterly meter reports) through four year period ends in July file for extension • 290 acre feet annually of unperfected water rights • 25 miles of water pipeline • Numerous earthen stock tanks Wind, Solar and Minerals • All mineral rights currently held by owner convey • NextEra Energy operates a wind farm on a high mesa in the northeastern part of the ranch via a lease agreement with Lobo Partners, LLC • Public Service Company of New Mexico owns and operates a 116.05-acre solar farm on the ranch Airports • About 55 miles from Albuquerque Sunport International Airport • 53 miles from Grants Municipal Airport • Dirt airstrip on property approximately 2,600’ X 80’ - small aircraft usage
$45,000,000  •  45,039 acres
Spreading over 45,000 contiguous acres in Southeast Colorado rests the Cimarron Valley Ranch, located between Elkhart, Kansas and Keyes, Oklahoma.  Over 70 square miles of cattle ranch includes approximately 22 miles of the historic Cimarron River running from Oklahoma into Colorado, coming within two miles of bridging the Comanche National Grasslands to the Cimarron National Grasslands in Kansas.  These two national grasslands, along with state land in Oklahoma, connects this ranch to almost a million acres of public land. The Cimarron Valley Ranch truly offers incredible diversity in regard to terrain, wildlife, livestock grazing, income opportunities and more.Overview: This is an extremely rare opportunity to own a ranch that currently supports 1,600 mother cows while managing some of the best hunting in the country.  The river bottom on this ranch averages just under a mile wide for the entire length of the ranch (22 miles) providing excellent soils, water, rotational grazing, excellent habitat and grass.  This mega-ranch is very diverse with wild game and is inhabited by Mule Deer, Rocky Mountain Elk, White-tailed Deer, Rio Grande Turkeys, Bobwhite Quail, and Blue Quail.  It is not unlikely to hunt bugling elk with over-the-counter licenses the same day as working dogs on large coveys of bobwhite and blue quail. Cattle Operation: Currently the ranch has over 1,600 mother cows and there is abundant grass and excellent water. The cattle operation is under excellent management and the program is about stewardship and balance between the improvement of wildlife habitat and the management and improvement of cattle grazing resources. The ranch is very well-watered, and the fences and working facilities are in good condition. The river bottom and the diversity of the landscape allow for rotational grazing at its finest.  With an excellent mix of grasses during all seasons and access to running calves on wheat pasture and triticale, this operation will put excellent pounds of gain on cattle.  The turn-key headquarters has good holding corrals, ranch manager facilities, barns, sheds and cattle working facilities.Water: The ranch is rich in water and provides sustainability for game and livestock alike. Currently 10 pivots are in place with quality water supply, and 10 additional pivots are approved with permits for doubling the tillable crop ground to increase the carrying capacity to 2,000 head. Over 40 stock tanks are littered throughout the ranch and The Cimarron River runs underground through most of the property, with watering holes and ponds littered along the river bottom.Game Management: With over 18 square miles of tree covered river bottom, wildlife has year around protection, excellent nesting cover, ample water and plenty of room for habitual movement. The well-managed property has over 780 acres of food plots in the river bottom with 14 high quality shooting houses.  The plots are planted with wheat, triticale, milo, sorghum and some turnips.  This acreage is accretion ground and has excellent soils that make up almost 10,000 acres of very fertile grass and cropland in just the river bottom. Big Game Hunting: This area is famous for excellent quality animals with respect to mule deer and white-tailed deer, but also offers a resident herd of elk year around! It is expected that the next state record white-tail may come from this area or the Arkansas River drainage to the north. It is not uncommon to have free range white-tails over 175 inches and much larger.  The ranch has world class animals with many mule deer over 180 inches and an elk herd that is improving each year with great crop and habitat practices. The ranch receives a good number of deer tags as vouchers in Colorado and Oklahoma allows for two buck licenses.  Elk tags for bull elk are over the counter and the season runs from September to January with any legal method of take.  In Colorado, the elk licenses are classified as “C Tag”, which means you can harvest a bull and buy another tag! This works very well for game managers as this tool helps on taking inferior animals out of the herd.  Elk quality in this area varies, but with such a large tract, some management can improve quality.  There have been bulls killed on the ranch up to 370 inches. In a nutshell, this property holds excellent numbers of fine animals and the game laws in Colorado and Oklahoma for this area lend well for the serious hunters. Quail: The quail populations on the ranch are World Class.  Blue Quail or Scaled Quail inhabit the hillsides on the upper sides of the river bottom and present excellent sporting opportunities for wing shooting.  Bobwhite Quail are prolific along the river bottom and are currently in record numbers on the ranch.  It is not uncommon to bust 20 plus coveys of 25-35 birds per day on the ranch.  The mixed bag of Bobs and Blues and two states to hunt make the opportunity even better. Pheasants: There are pheasants finding the great habitat planted along the river.  A great spring will offer excellent hatches next fall! There are over 600,000 acres of public land adjacent to this ranch with excellent wildlife populations. Believe me when you plant food and provide water they show up! Waterfowl: Waterfowl hunting on the ranch is undeveloped, but the land is located in a good area for traffic of waterfowl.  Improvement of sloughs and some ponds could greatly enhance the waterfowl hunting. The Lesser Prairie Chicken: The Lesser Prairie Chicken can be found on the southern portion of the ranch. This area of Colorado, Oklahoma and adjoining Kansas Cimarron National Grassland hold and grow a good number of Lesser Prairie Chicken.  This area is considered one of the premier spots to observe the birds. The lesser prairie chicken is listed on the endangered species list so hunting is not allowed. Locally, the Lesser Prairie Chicken primarily inhabits sand-sage prairie south of the Cimarron River, a strip about two to five miles wide.The Lesser Prairie Chicken is similar in appearance to the Greater Prairie Chicken, although it is slightly smaller and its air sacs on its neck are red-orange in color, whereas the greater has yellow-orange air sacs. Lesser Prairie Chickens are dependent upon rangeland conditions. Sand-sage prairie, with its mixture of short and mid-grasses, sagebrush, and yucca components, provides the birds with nesting and brood rearing cover, and food.The Lodge: There is a 7,000 square foot lodge, which was built in 2005 and has 7 bedrooms and 7 baths and is in first class condition.  The lodge offers a commercial kitchen and excellent open floor plan with high ceilings and an indoor wood burning fireplace.  There is an exciting trap range just out the back door for owners’ enjoyment.  The main lodge sits overlooking the Cimarron River and some low water ponds in the river bottom.  Privacy is at its best on the Cimarron Valley Ranch offering good access with only one road in and one road out.  Cimarron National Grassland: The Cimarron National Grassland, located just 2.5 miles east on the river, is one of twenty National Grasslands administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Located within Morton and Stevens Counties in southwestern Kansas, the Cimarron National Grassland contains 108,175 acres.Comanche National Grassland: The Comanche National Grassland includes over 440, 000 acres in southeastern Colorado. On the Comanche National Grassland, you can explore southeastern Colorado’s rich history. The Grassland has many stories to tell, from dinosaurs roaming the shoreline of a vast lake 150 million years ago, to Mexican and American traders traveling the Santa Fe Trail 150 years ago.The Santa Fe Trail: The Santa Fe Trail goes through immediate area and across the ranch.  This rich historic trail offers many tails of long ago.  It truly signifies that the West is and was a great place!  This ranch, with its ability to connect two large national grasslands, is very rare.  We may never see another time to accomplish such an important task.Ranch Landscape: Rock cliffs, cottonwood groves, grassy fields, yucca and sage brush are scattered throughout the land. Elevation ranges from 3,150 to 3,540 feet. Seasonal variety is provided by native grasses and riparian vegetation along the Cimarron River. The geology of the area includes sandstone, shale, limestone, sand and gravel.Area Climate: The climate here is characterized by mild winters, hot dry summers and cool evenings. Spring and Fall seasons have moderate temperatures accompanied by an occasional windy day. Precipitation, usually less than 19 inches per year, is concentrated from April to September. Snowfall is minimal and short-lived. This ranch has such diversity it is hard to explain. Twenty-two miles of highly productive river bottom within 2.5 miles of connecting the Cimarron National Grassland with the Comanche National Grassland is truly amazing. Grazing, hunting, history, improvements, irrigation, cattle and wildlife!  The production potential and sheer vast amounts of highly productive land on this operation make it a very rare offering.  Please give us a call for a private showing of this fine ranch. 
Showcase
$45,000,000  •  45,039 acres
Spreading over 45,000 contiguous acres in Southeast Colorado rests the Cimarron Valley Ranch, located between Elkhart, Kansas and Keyes, Oklahoma.  Over 70 square miles of cattle ranch includes approximately 22 miles of the historic Cimarron River running from Oklahoma into Colorado, coming within two miles of bridging the Comanche National Grasslands to the Cimarron National Grasslands in Kansas.  These two national grasslands, along with state land in Oklahoma, connects this ranch to almost a million acres of public land. The Cimarron Valley Ranch truly offers incredible diversity in regard to terrain, wildlife, livestock grazing, income opportunities and more. Overview: This is an extremely rare opportunity to own a ranch that currently supports 1,600 mother cows while managing some of the best hunting in the country.  The river bottom on this ranch averages just under a mile wide for the entire length of the ranch (22 miles) providing excellent soils, water, rotational grazing, excellent habitat and grass.  This mega-ranch is very diverse with wild game and is inhabited by Mule Deer, Rocky Mountain Elk, White-tailed Deer, Rio Grande Turkeys, Bobwhite Quail, and Blue Quail.  It is not unlikely to hunt bugling elk with over-the-counter licenses the same day as working dogs on large coveys of bobwhite and blue quail.  Cattle Operation: Currently the ranch has over 1,600 mother cows and there is abundant grass and excellent water. The cattle operation is under excellent management and the program is about stewardship and balance between the improvement of wildlife habitat and the management and improvement of cattle grazing resources. The ranch is very well-watered, and the fences and working facilities are in good condition. The river bottom and the diversity of the landscape allow for rotational grazing at its finest.  With an excellent mix of grasses during all seasons and access to running calves on wheat pasture and triticale, this operation will put excellent pounds of gain on cattle.  The turn-key headquarters has good holding corrals, ranch manager facilities, barns, sheds and cattle working facilities. Water: The ranch is rich in water and provides sustainability for game and livestock alike. Currently 10 pivots are in place with quality water supply, and 10 additional pivots are approved with permits for doubling the tillable crop ground to increase the carrying capacity to 2,000 head. Over 40 stock tanks are littered throughout the ranch and The Cimarron River runs underground through most of the property, with watering holes and ponds littered along the river bottom. Game Management: With over 18 square miles of tree covered river bottom, wildlife has year around protection, excellent nesting cover, ample water and plenty of room for habitual movement. The well-managed property has over 780 acres of food plots in the river bottom with 14 high quality shooting houses.  The plots are planted with wheat, triticale, milo, sorghum and some turnips.  This acreage is accretion ground and has excellent soils that make up almost 10,000 acres of very fertile grass and cropland in just the river bottom.  Big Game Hunting: This area is famous for excellent quality animals with respect to mule deer and white-tailed deer, but also offers a resident herd of elk year around! It is expected that the next state record white-tail may come from this area or the Arkansas River drainage to the north. It is not uncommon to have free range white-tails over 175 inches and much larger.  The ranch has world class animals with many mule deer over 180 inches and an elk herd that is improving each year with great crop and habitat practices.  The ranch receives a good number of deer tags as vouchers in Colorado and Oklahoma allows for two buck licenses.  Elk tags for bull elk are over the counter and the season runs from September to January with any legal method of take.  In Colorado, the elk licenses are classified as “C Tag”, which means you can harvest a bull and buy another tag! This works very well for game managers as this tool helps on taking inferior animals out of the herd.  Elk quality in this area varies, but with such a large tract, some management can improve quality.  There have been bulls killed on the ranch up to 370 inches. In a nutshell, this property holds excellent numbers of fine animals and the game laws in Colorado and Oklahoma for this area lend well for the serious hunters.  Quail: The quail populations on the ranch are World Class.  Blue Quail or Scaled Quail inhabit the hillsides on the upper sides of the river bottom and present excellent sporting opportunities for wing shooting.  Bobwhite Quail are prolific along the river bottom and are currently in record numbers on the ranch.  It is not uncommon to bust 20 plus coveys of 25-35 birds per day on the ranch.  The mixed bag of Bobs and Blues and two states to hunt make the opportunity even better.  Pheasants: There are pheasants finding the great habitat planted along the river.  A great spring will offer excellent hatches next fall! There are over 600,000 acres of public land adjacent to this ranch with excellent wildlife populations. Believe me when you plant food and provide water they show up!  Waterfowl: Waterfowl hunting on the ranch is undeveloped, but the land is located in a good area for traffic of waterfowl.  Improvement of sloughs and some ponds could greatly enhance the waterfowl hunting.  The Lesser Prairie Chicken: The Lesser Prairie Chicken can be found on the southern portion of the ranch. This area of Colorado, Oklahoma and adjoining Kansas Cimarron National Grassland hold and grow a good number of Lesser Prairie Chicken.  This area is considered one of the premier spots to observe the birds. The lesser prairie chicken is listed on the endangered species list so hunting is not allowed. Locally, the Lesser Prairie Chicken primarily inhabits sand-sage prairie south of the Cimarron River, a strip about two to five miles wide. The Lesser Prairie Chicken is similar in appearance to the Greater Prairie Chicken, although it is slightly smaller and its air sacs on its neck are red-orange in color, whereas the greater has yellow-orange air sacs. Lesser Prairie Chickens are dependent upon rangeland conditions. Sand-sage prairie, with its mixture of short and mid-grasses, sagebrush, and yucca components, provides the birds with nesting and brood rearing cover, and food. The Lodge: There is a 7,000 square foot lodge, which was built in 2005 and has 7 bedrooms and 7 baths and is in first class condition.  The lodge offers a commercial kitchen and excellent open floor plan with high ceilings and an indoor wood burning fireplace.  There is an exciting trap range just out the back door for owners’ enjoyment.  The main lodge sits overlooking the Cimarron River and some low water ponds in the river bottom.  Privacy is at its best on the Cimarron Valley Ranch offering good access with only one road in and one road out.   Cimarron National Grassland: The Cimarron National Grassland, located just 2.5 miles east on the river, is one of twenty National Grasslands administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service. Located within Morton and Stevens Counties in southwestern Kansas, the Cimarron National Grassland contains 108,175 acres. Comanche National Grassland: The Comanche National Grassland includes over 440, 000 acres in southeastern Colorado. On the Comanche National Grassland, you can explore southeastern Colorado’s rich history. The Grassland has many stories to tell, from dinosaurs roaming the shoreline of a vast lake 150 million years ago, to Mexican and American traders traveling the Santa Fe Trail 150 years ago. The Santa Fe Trail: The Santa Fe Trail goes through immediate area and across the ranch.  This rich historic trail offers many tails of long ago.  It truly signifies that the West is and was a great place!  This ranch, with its ability to connect two large national grasslands, is very rare.  We may never see another time to accomplish such an important task. Ranch Landscape: Rock cliffs, cottonwood groves, grassy fields, yucca and sage brush are scattered throughout the land. Elevation ranges from 3,150 to 3,540 feet. Seasonal variety is provided by native grasses and riparian vegetation along the Cimarron River. The geology of the area includes sandstone, shale, limestone, sand and gravel. Area Climate: The climate here is characterized by mild winters, hot dry summers and cool evenings. Spring and Fall seasons have moderate temperatures accompanied by an occasional windy day. Precipitation, usually less than 19 inches per year, is concentrated from April to September. Snowfall is minimal and short-lived.  This ranch has such diversity it is hard to explain. Twenty-two miles of highly productive river bottom within 2.5 miles of connecting the Cimarron National Grassland with the Comanche National Grassland is truly amazing. Grazing, hunting, history, improvements, irrigation, cattle and wildlife!  The production potential and sheer vast amounts of highly productive land on this operation make it a very rare offering.  Please give us a call for a private showing of this fine ranch.  
$16,500,000  •  43,278 acres
The 53,238-acre Antelope Springs Ranch is a historically profitable cattle ranch located in the heart of eastern Montanas grazing country. Using holistic ranch management techniques, the ranch currently supports more than 1,000 year-round cow units, as well as 700+ sheep during the summer months.
$18,945,000  •  42,558 acres
Located just off Wyoming State Hwy. 116 approximately 20 miles south of Upton, in the heart of Weston County, Wyoming, this 42,558± acre legacy ranch consists of 31,551± deeded acres, 1,920± State Lease, 3,400± Forest Service Lease and 5,687± BLM lease acres. Located in an area known for very hardy grasses, the ranch is owner-rated at 1,400 head of mother cows year-round with very little, if any, hay fed in most winters. This very well-watered, low overhead cake and grass ranch has an exceptional headquarters with a 5,000 sq. ft. ranch style home, a 60’x300’ Morton livestock barn/arena, a 60’x60’ Morton finished shop with a 60’x140’ attached storage shed, and 30’x40’ metal shop. In addition to the headquarters, there is another set of improvements complete with a house and working facilities. A large set of Temple Grandin designed pipe working pens and a calving barn round out the improvements. Located in elk hunting Area 123, the ranch boasts some of the best trophy elk hunting in the area along with exceptional mule deer, antelope and upland game bird hunting. Listing Price: $18,945,000 For additional information contact Clark & Associates Land Brokers at (307) 334-2025.
$20,000,000  •  40,962.18 acres
Chambers Ranch - 500 head with 17,496 deeded acres northeast of Flagstaff.
$3,200,000  •  34,301 acres
Apache Gap RanchApache Gap is a high desert ranch located approximately 30-minutes southeast of Interstate 25 and Truth or Consequences in Sierra County, New Mexico.  The 34,300 +/- acre property is fully-contiguous and comprised of 1,936 deeded acres, a 6,153-acre State grazing lease and a 26,212-acre BLM lease.  Carrying capacity for the property is rated at 275 head with current ownership running a mixed Angus and Charolais herd.  With nearly 60 lineal miles of well-maintained interior and exterior fencing, the ranch provides (5) large pastures (8-11 sections each) and (7) smaller traps for flexible rotation.  Water distribution is impressive, consisting of an extensive network of underground pipeline and storage tanks with a combined storage capacity of approximately 150,000 gallons.  In addition, there are (2) domestic wells serving headquarters, (5) windmills and numerous dirt tanks and drinkers strategically placed throughout.  Elevations range from 4,800 feet in the bottomland pastures to about 7,600 feet near the summit of Timber and Brushy Mountains along the western perimeter of the ranch.  The ranch provides spectacular views from the upper elevations of both Caballo Lake and the Elephant Butte Reservoir State Parks (see descriptions below). WildlifeMule deer are common throughout the upper mountain pastures with herds of antelope in the lower portions of the property.  Desert Big Horn Sheep also range along the rocky cliff areas of the Caballo Mountains on the far western periphery.  Free-range gemsbok/oryx, javelina, coyotes, foxes, mountain lion, and the occasional black bear, also frequent the ranch.  Dove and coveys of quail can often be found at the various water holes.*New for 2019 – Pronghorn Antelope licenses can now be purchased over-the-counter through Game and Fish locations or licensed vendors.  Licenses are valid on private deeded land wherein landowner permission has been granted.ImprovementsHeadquarters are located in the north-central portion of the ranch at the base of the Caballo Mountain range.  The primary residence consists of an 1,800 square foot ranch-style home of a three-bedroom, two-bath design.  Amenities include a stone fireplace, utility/storage room, covered porches and a large fenced yard encircled by shade and various fruit trees.  The bunkhouse consists of a 1,000 square foot two-bedroom, one-bath adobe structure with log and tile interior accents.The ranch also includes hay and implement storage barns, large cattle holding yard, working pens, round corral, chutes and a scale.RecreationElephant Butte lake is New Mexico’s largest at nearly 40,000-acres and contains (2) marinas.  Boat and personal watercraft rentals are available.  The lake provides miles of beaches, hiking trails and views in all directions.  In addition to the surrounding sights, Elephant Butte is a well-known fishery containing some of the largest white and black bass, stripers, crappie, catfish and walleye in the southwest region.Located 20-miles downstream from Elephant Butte is the 11,000-acre Caballo Reservoir, which is similarly fed by the Rio Grande River.  Caballo Reservoir is also recognized as a good bass, catfish, crappie and walleye fishery with boat docks and ramps.SummaryApache Gap Ranch is the opportunity to own a time-tested working cattle operation that can also be utilized in tandem as a sporting retreat.  The utility of the ranch has constantly been improved and maintained over the years as evidenced by the water availability and rotational grazing practices.  Call Brent Hedrick or Greg Liddle for a qualified showing.  Co-brokers welcome.
$3,200,000  •  34,301 acres
Apache Gap Ranch Apache Gap is a high desert ranch located approximately 30-minutes southeast of Interstate 25 and Truth or Consequences in Sierra County, New Mexico.  The 34,300 +/- acre property is fully-contiguous and comprised of 1,936 deeded acres, a 6,153-acre State grazing lease and a 26,212-acre BLM lease.  Carrying capacity for the property is rated at 275 head with current ownership running a mixed Angus and Charolais herd.  With nearly 60 lineal miles of well-maintained interior and exterior fencing, the ranch provides (5) large pastures (8-11 sections each) and (7) smaller traps for flexible rotation.  Water distribution is impressive, consisting of an extensive network of underground pipeline and storage tanks with a combined storage capacity of approximately 150,000 gallons.  In addition, there are (2) domestic wells serving headquarters, (5) windmills and numerous dirt tanks and drinkers strategically placed throughout.  Elevations range from 4,800 feet in the bottomland pastures to about 7,600 feet near the summit of Timber and Brushy Mountains along the western perimeter of the ranch.  The ranch provides spectacular views from the upper elevations of both Caballo Lake and the Elephant Butte Reservoir State Parks (see descriptions below).  Wildlife Mule deer are common throughout the upper mountain pastures with herds of antelope in the lower portions of the property.  Desert Big Horn Sheep also range along the rocky cliff areas of the Caballo Mountains on the far western periphery.  Free-range gemsbok/oryx, javelina, coyotes, foxes, mountain lion, and the occasional black bear, also frequent the ranch.  Dove and coveys of quail can often be found at the various water holes. *New for 2019 – Pronghorn Antelope licenses can now be purchased over-the-counter through Game and Fish locations or licensed vendors.  Licenses are valid on private deeded land wherein landowner permission has been granted. Improvements Headquarters are located in the north-central portion of the ranch at the base of the Caballo Mountain range.  The primary residence consists of an 1,800 square foot ranch-style home of a three-bedroom, two-bath design.  Amenities include a stone fireplace, utility/storage room, covered porches and a large fenced yard encircled by shade and various fruit trees.  The bunkhouse consists of a 1,000 square foot two-bedroom, one-bath adobe structure with log and tile interior accents. The ranch also includes hay and implement storage barns, large cattle holding yard, working pens, round corral, chutes and a scale. Recreation Elephant Butte lake is New Mexico’s largest at nearly 40,000-acres and contains (2) marinas.  Boat and personal watercraft rentals are available.  The lake provides miles of beaches, hiking trails and views in all directions.  In addition to the surrounding sights, Elephant Butte is a well-known fishery containing some of the largest white and black bass, stripers, crappie, catfish and walleye in the southwest region. Located 20-miles downstream from Elephant Butte is the 11,000-acre Caballo Reservoir, which is similarly fed by the Rio Grande River.  Caballo Reservoir is also recognized as a good bass, catfish, crappie and walleye fishery with boat docks and ramps. Summary Apache Gap Ranch is the opportunity to own a time-tested working cattle operation that can also be utilized in tandem as a sporting retreat.  The utility of the ranch has constantly been improved and maintained over the years as evidenced by the water availability and rotational grazing practices.  Call Brent Hedrick or Greg Liddle for a qualified showing.  Co-brokers welcome.
$250,000,000  •  33,777 acres
Texas history and its landscapes are often defined best by the union of unlikely partners and one can find such a thriving partnership at one of Texas' most unique properties: Sandow Lakes. These 33,777± acres feature the same dichotomous elements that work in perfect harmony: a modern business development juxtaposed against a vast array of protected marsh and wetland. Home to a diverse group of wildlife and waterfowl, most of which call Sandow Lakes home year round, the natural beauty is protected and thrives with native flora and fauna, offering ample opportunities for the outdoor and recreational enthusiast. The property sale includes abundant surface and groundwater rights, equipment assets and other infrastructure on the development side and offers easy access to the city amenities in the small, historic town of Rockdale. 100% of owned minerals will be conveyed. Contact Us for a brochure.www.icon.globalhttp://www.sandowlakes.com/
Reduced
$4,500,000  •  33,676.7 acres
$5,000,000
The Walking L Ranch remains one of the last operating cattle ranches headquartered right in Wickenburg.
$52,480,000  •  32,800 acres
Ford Ranch, with over 100 years of excellent land management practices, is the magazine cover photo of Hill Country beauty with rolling grasslands painted in blue bonnets, huge century oaks and mesquites, abundant wildlife and healthy livestock.
$37,250,000  •  30,654 acres
$14,950,000  •  29,142 acres
“World-class” is no exaggeration when describing the exceptional trophy elk hunting on the renowned Southern Cross Ranch in west-central New Mexico. On the Southern Cross Ranch, geography, genetics and habitat have combined to create an entire ecosystem that produces some of the largest bull elk on the planet. The Southern Cross is indeed a “land of giants” well-known for amazing numbers of 350- to 400-class bulls that have free access to its 29,142 acres (18,535 deeded). Simply put, the Southern Cross controls over 45 square miles of the finest trophy elk habitat anywhere.
Reduced
$25,000,000  •  26,600 acres
$31,000,000
Dean Witter's legacy ranch with 26,600 +/- acres and over 16 miles of Eel River frontage. Headquarters home with phenomenal river and panoramic views, a horse ranch, cow facilities handling 800 mother cows year around, many other homes and outbuildings and abundant wildlife.
Reduced
$25,000,000  •  26,600 acres
$31,000,000
Lone Pine Ranch FOR ALL PHOTOS, INTERACTIVE MAPS AND THE MOST COMPLETE INFORMATION AVAILABLE VISIT HALL AND HALL PROPERTY WEBSITEThere is nothing the least bit contrived about this place. Lone Pine Ranch is the land legacy of stock market titan, Dean Witter. Authentic is the most fitting single word description of this historic landholding spanning across Trinity and Mendocino counties in Northern California. Comprised of three large ranches purchased by Mr. Witter starting in 1942, this ranch is gargantuan in size and nonpareil in natural beauty. With over 26,600 deeded acres all in one contiguous block, it is supported by viable cattle and timber operations. The ranch is conservatively estimated to have a carrying capacity of over 800 cows and approximately 30% of the ranch is a tenderly managed timber resource. There are over 16.5 miles of frontage on Northern California's Eel River, which covets National Wild and Scenic designation. Salmon and steelhead still migrate into these waters from the Pacific Ocean, and resident wildlife includes plentiful populations of elk, blacktail deer, pig, bear and quail. The old-time improvements convey the sense of a living museum. The main home, built in the mid-1940s, overlooks the Eel River canyon from a vantage point that still looks today much like it did when Mr. Witter made the decision to build here. The creak of the screen doors is an auditory time machine that journeys back to the innocent joys of childhood.