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$319,200,000  •  420,000 acres
Brewster Ranches is around half the size of Rhode Island with over 420,000 contiguous acres. It starts just 15 miles from the Gage Hotel in Marathon heading south 31 miles all the way to Black Gap Wildlife Management Area which is a stone throws away from Big Bend National Park filled with outdoor adventures. Classic “Big Bend Country” of the Old West, Brewster Ranches has maintained much of the environment and appearance of times past, rich in history and today wildlife hunting opportunities such as desert mule deer, elk, desert big horn sheep, scaled quail and some of the most important habitat for migrations of wildlife in the Chihuahuan Desert between the borderlands of Texas and Mexico to the south.
$149,490,000  •  196,000 acres
Dove Mountain offers a variety of habitats and improvements which start on the north at Tres Hermanos summit on the Shely Peaks at 5,210 feet down into a wide scenic valley where you find the live water section of San Francisco Creek that is cottonwood lined for over two miles. An airstrip and giant hanger. The Pine Mountains where there are some of the most majestic overlooks in the entire region. Pinion pine found on the north slope and above on the Mesa and within the canyons provide habitat for an Elk herd that can be seen regularly. If there is one thing that makes this ranch stand out is the availability of Desert Big Horn Sheep habitats as well as the availability of permits by TPWD.
$85,995,000  •  117,000 acres
Classic “Big Bend Country” of the Old West, Rio Texico Ranch has maintained much of the environment and appearance of times past. Rio Texico Ranch's San Francisco Creek is a year-round live water with Cottonwood gallery forests on both banks and riparian vegetation are very rare in this desert and a magnet for wildlife. The ranch is a working cattle ranch with some excellent recently improved infrastructure. There are miles of new internal fences, pens, and traps as well as water and road improvements.
$40,317,050  •  52,022 acres
YE Mesa Ranch is as beautiful and rugged as it gets in the Big Bend County with an excellent road system accessing valleys, mountains and canyons throughout. The spine of the Santiago Mountains is the western boundary on the north ranch but cuts across the south ranch creating a series of ridges and valleys and outstanding views. Connected to the west side of the Santiago Mountains is YE Mesa itself with a raised volcanic uplift and peak slopping off toward Chalk Draw just off the ranch. There are numerous commanding vistas of the entire Big Bend Region and its mountain features including El Pico in the Del Carmens and the entire Chiosos Mountain skyline.
$28,151,475  •  34,123 acres
Horse Mountain Ranch is located just a 30-minute drive from the Gage Hotel in Marathon, which serves as the gateway to Big Bend Nation Park to the south. Horse Mountain Ranch is divided into two contiguous historical ownerships with the north portion being a wide valley between the Pena Blanca Mountains, Horse Mountain and Twin Peaks creating an expanse called Lightning Flat where the headwaters of Horse Draw and Pena Blanca Draw are located. The Headquarters is located on the north unit adjacent to the Historic Reed Spring which makes a beautiful cottonwood tree lined lake.
Reduced
$49,200,000  •  32,800 acres
$52,480,000
Ford Ranch, with over 100 years of excellent land management practices, is the magazine cover photo of Hill Country beauty with rolling grasslands painted in blue bonnets, huge century oaks and mesquites, abundant wildlife and healthy livestock.
$7,695,620  •  22,972 acres
The ranch is situated at the convergence of three biologically-distinct eco-regions in Texas; the Texas Hill Country to the east, the Chihuahuan Desert to the west, and the subtropical Tamaulipan Brushland to the south, creating one of the most unique wildlife habitats in the state.
$15,554,171  •  19,814 acres
Tesnus Ranch is a cattle and hunting recreation ranch with an amazing amount of seclusion framed between towering mountains all within diverse low, mid to high desert habitats. An excellent all-weather caliche road provides access into the ranch where near the entrance there is a very nice modern 3-bedroom 2-bath Headquarters home.
$8,000,000  •  18,825.81 acres
The Chinati Ranch derives its name from the Apache word ch'íná'itíh which translates into gate or mountain pass. The ranch is 11,825± deeded acres and 1,940± acres of surface lease for a total of 13,714± acres all in Presidio County. It is entirely Chihuahuan Desert and meanders roughly 11+ miles along the Rio Grande River in the foothills of the Chinati Mountain Range. The ranch is 26 miles from Presidio, TX and the same distance to Ojinaga, Mexico. Dining, services and an FBO are available 56 miles away in the iconic cowboy and cultural oasis of Marfa. Commercial air travel is available via the El Paso International airport 225 miles to the northwest. Chinati, TX is an unincorporated ghost town that began as a Mexican mining village with cotton and vegetable farming along the river. A post office was established in 1922 and stopped operation in 1939. There are remnants of a church and adobe buildings still found on site. The views are absolutely stunning with fantastic rock formations on both sides of the border. The ranch has varied terrain from flats, ocotillo forest, riparian river bottom, rock formations, cliffs and canyons, all culminating into an aesthetically attractive property. There are two solar pumps and associated drinkers to provide the wildlife water year-round. There is a healthy mule deer population on the property along with aoudad, javelina and the occasional mountain lion. Blue and Gambel’s quail are also permanent residents. Far removed from a fast-paced world, Chinati Ranch is a blank canvas where recreational opportunities abound in the unique Chihuahuan Desert ecosystem of Far West Texas. The Facts: ~ 11,825± deeded acres and 13,714± acres with state leased land ~ 4,005± acres of mineral classified land ~ 21 miles from Presidio, 60 miles from Marfa, and 30 miles from Big Bend State Park ~ FM 170 paved access ~ Two water wells with solar pumps and three drinkers ~ 11 meandering miles of Rio Grande River frontage ~ Recreational playground: hunting, rock climbing, fishing, 4x4 crawling, mountain biking, game viewing ~ Wildlife includes mule deer, aoudad, quail, ~ Electricity
$100,000,000  •  17,132 acres
The 17,132-acre Rancho Agua Grande, located 25 miles northwest of Uvalde where South Texas, West Texas and the Hill Country meet, is one of largest live water ranches for sale in Texas. Year-round Live Oak Creek, fed by more than 30 springs, bisects the ranch from north to south for about seven miles. The line between Uvalde and Kinney counties is on a similar north-south axis. The shady pecan bottom along the creek stands in contrast to the rugged hills and deep canyons that characterize the transitional landscape. The ranch is home to Boiling Mountain, the highest peak in Uvalde County, and Salmon Peak, the highest point in Kinney County. Because three eco regions converge on the Rancho Agua Grande, the vegetation is diverse ranging from pinon pines to live oaks and mesquites, huisache, guajillo and black brush. Its a feast for human eyes and a natural buffet for wildlife. Live Oak Creek is a calling card for the ranches native and exotic wildlife. They gather to drink and loaf under the trees making it easy to view some of the more than 40 species of game from around the globe that roam the property. Its possible to see kangaroos, camels, zebras, gemsbok, sable, water buffalo, white bison, Iranian red sheep, scimitar-horned oryx and water bucks just to name a few in a single afternoon. Whitetails, turkey, dove and a limited population of quail are native to the ranch. More than 50 miles of high-fence encircle the perimeter keeping the desirable managed wildlife inside and the free-ranging game out. With the rich, abundant diversity of wildlife, its no wonder that Rancho Agua Grande is considered one of the nations premier hunting destinations. Currently, its run as an exclusive commercial hunting operation, and as such has served as the backdrop for numerous high-profile hunting shows. The ranch is managed under an MLDP Level 3 permit and features 30+ feeders and hunting blinds located to make the most of the extended season. Because both banks of Live Oak Creek are within the ranches borders, the access is completely controlled and completely private. The only tubers, kayakers or anglers enjoying the crystalline, rock-bottomed stream will be those you invite. The creeks flow is slowed and pooled by 10 dams strategically placed along its route. Numerous lakes, some large enough to jet ski on, dot the landscape. Catfish, bass and bream swim in the clear water. The groundwater is as plentiful as the surface water and there are many water wells distributed over the ranch. In an arid climate, water has long been the lands most highly valued asset. Native Americans relied on the life-giving water as evidenced by the numerous undisturbed Indian mounds and middens located in close proximity to the creek. Lumbering dinosaurs pressed tracks into once soft mud that hardened protecting the imprint from the ravages of time. The limestone hills are pocked by caves including some that cut deeply beneath the earth and invite exploration. After a long day of adventures, the 6,000 square foot lodge with its antique bar, dance floor and bandstand is the perfect place to relax. With a capacity of 250 people, the lodge is also an ideal site for events such weddings, meetings or reunions. An additional 2,300 square foot of covered porches accommodate an even larger party. The lodges expansive main room is bookended by massive fireplaces that stretch from the floor to the vaulted log ceiling that soars 34 feet above. A game loft features a pool table, darts, poker and Big Buck Hunter, a popular arcade game. Guests will enjoy their stays in one of the eight antique cabins dating to the mid-19th century. These cabins were transplanted from the mountains of Kentucky where pioneering families called them home. The cabins have been restored and updated so they meet the most discriminating standards for modern convenience and rustic elegance. Most include a Jacuzzi tub, a kitchenette and a spacious living room and can sleep three to six guests depending on the cabins size and arrangement. Other residences include the managers house and the cooler house, both of which are three bedroom/one bath cabins. Numerous equipment sheds, storage buildings as well as a meat processing room with a walk-in cooler round out the ranchs infrastructure. A blacktop road runs from the main entrance to the main compound. Access is ensured by a permanent easement. For those who prefer the convenience of air travel, Rancho Agua Grande has a 5,800 foot x 70 foot instrument marked, painted and lighted runway that is completely surrounded by a high-fence ensuring that the airstrip is always clear. Jet fuel is available in Uvalde, which is 25 minutes away by car. Rancho Agua Grande is the place for people who appreciate superlatives. Its ideally suited for a commercial hunting destination, a corporate retreat, an events center or an enviable private ranch open only to family and friends. Within its fences, everything is possible . To see the unique splendor and unlimited potential of the Rancho Agua Grande for yourself, contact Howard W. Hood at (830) 739-3815. The ranch is available for $100 million.
Reduced
$8,701,700  •  14,035 acres
$12,500,000
The historic French Ingram Ranch in Val Verde County, Texas has over 7 miles of crystal clear flowing Pecos River frontage. This very private ranch has been in the same family since the 1920’s and includes a spectacular cut limestone home, custom built in the 1930’s. The headquarters area is nestled in a beautiful valley with live oaks, conjuring up images of famed Texas Ranger Capt. Jack Hays stepping out to greet a visitor on the screened porch. This is an incredible year-round recreational ranch paradise that offers both hunting and fishing, not to mention exploring for Native American artifacts or pictographs and enjoying the stars at night or the daytime views of the Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains. Area Attractions and Location: The ranch is conveniently located near a variety of attractions and places of interest including Del Rio with restaurants, shopping, museums and the oldest winery in Texas, dating back to 1883. Lake Amistad offers some of the finest large lake bass fishing to be found in the USA. A visit to nearby Seminole Canyon State Park will enhance the new owner's understanding of the history of the area and the ranch's former inhabitants. The colorful tales surrounding Judge Roy Bean's "Law West Of the Pecos" make a quick trip to Langtry an interesting step back into early Texas. Specifically, the ranch is located about 8.5 miles north of Langtry, TX, accessed off of Pandale Rd. on the west side of the Pecos. Layout, Topography & Terrain: This ranch features numerous access points to over 7 miles of the clear flowing Pecos River. It also has incredible topography for safari style as well as spot and stalk hunting throughout the ranch! The varied terrain features numerous canyons with many draws holding live oaks amongst other native fauna. Saddles and gentle slopes are covered with common desert species of brush, native grasses and succulents. Most parts of the ranch are easily accessible with the existing road system. Wildlife, Hunting and Fishing: Wildlife species that can be found on this ranch include white-tailed deer, mule deer, blue quail, turkey, dove, javelina, varmints and songbirds. The river provides fishing for largemouth bass and catfish. Improvements: The Main House, located in the Headquarters area, was built in the 1930’s and has been maintained in great condition. It is a spectacular example of a two-story classic Texas cut limestone ranch house with high ceilings and custom crown molding; three bedrooms, two full baths, hardwood floors, French doors and an incredible screened porch! Also in the headquarters area are two bunkhouses, a detached carport/quarters/storage building, a fully furnished enhanced mobile home, a shop and several barns. The ranch is fenced into 15 pastures for livestock management. Water: Over 7 miles of Pecos River frontage, with access at numerous places, including one with a campsite. Not only does the river provide fishing opportunity (and habitat for wildlife), it also is great for canoeing, kayaking and tubing in a truly private and pristine setting. The ranch also has 5 water wells, 4 storage tanks/pilas and about 9 miles of associated piped distribution. The various wells, storage and distribution provide water to the headquarters facilities and some 25 plus troughs, providing water for wildlife and livestock alike. Minerals: 3,200 acres have state classified minerals and the rights associated with such classification will convey to Buyer. Seller’s owned minerals are negotiable; there is no production. History and Points of Interest: The ranch has at least six known sites containing Native American Pictographs (Rock Art). The road leading out of the river in the ranch’s Live Oak Pasture (named for the large Live Oak just above the river that has managed to grow and thrive seemingly out of solid rock) is also known as the “Encino Solo Trail”. In the early days of ranching in this part of Texas, the area ranchers used the “Encino Solo Trail” to cross the river and move their stock from pastures east of the Pecos to shipping points located west of the Pecos. Other: Furnishings to convey except select pieces and some window coverings in main house. Multiple runway sites. Taxes: Currently taxes assessed at Agricultural Value, where applicable. Disclaimer: The information contained herein has been gathered from sources deemed reliable; however, Republic Ranches, LLC and its principals, members, officers, associates, agents and employees cannot guarantee the accuracy of such information. The information contained herein is also subject to changes, errors, omissions, prior sale or withdrawal of property from the market without prior notice, and approval of purchase by owner. Prospective buyers should verify all information to their satisfaction.
Reduced
$6,052,267  •  13,468 acres
$8,341,656
Location Coyanosa Draw Ranch formally known as the Alpine High Ranch is part of the historic Townsend Ranch. The Hudgins family was granted this property as payment for building a fence around the huge historic Townsend ownership. The ranch fronts on Highway 67 between Fort Stockton and Alpine, with the entrance just 18 miles south of I-10 and 26 miles from Fort Stockton and its regional amenities. The ranch has a major drainage, Coyanosa Draw, that crosses the property and is adjacent to some of the largest ranches in the Trans Pecos, including the Elsinore and Leoncita Ranches. Center Pivot Irrigation is operating adjacent to the south with 1,000 gal/min wells confirming the amazing groundwater resources. Acreage 12,177.60 Acres Owned and 1,290.83 Acres Leased in Pecos County, Texas. Description Coyanosa Draw Ranch lies over a freshwater aquifer and represents a diverse landscape of deep bottom soils along the broad gravelly flats, limestone hills with commanding views of many of the area mountain ranges, including the Del Norte, Glass and The Davis Mountains. This cow country hunting ranch is very accessible, yet you can hide away in the many interesting secret draws and cover where you will find abundant populations of desert Mule Deer, Elk, dove, and the wily Blue Quail. The ranch has a tremendous road infrastructure and, with just a corner of the ranch located along Highway 67, it is very private but extremely accessible. The topography of the ranch is a broad open valley with several limestone hills, cut by broad wooded draws and elevations ranging from 3,500 feet to 3,100 feet, which makes for a wide variety of soils and a very interesting mix of habitats. The ranch to the south has several center pivot irrigation fields right up to the fence-line, accessing the same aquifer under this ranch, the Hovey Channel. There are several areas where this could be replicated along Coyanosa Draw as there is a huge amount of relatively shallow fresh water, with deep soils. The ranch has a number of windmills and solar wells. Electricity is located at the southwest corner and an excellent submersible water pump produces from only 220 feet. There are several dirt tanks on the ranch with room for many more. Monsoon rains come in the summers, providing for an excellent growing season of a wide variety of Chihuahuan Desert plants, shrubs, and grasses. There is an extensive road network on the ranch and the exterior fences range from new to functional. Several caliche gravel pits will provide significant materials for future needs. The owners have built extensive all-weather caliche roads. There is a great metal barn, as well as a set of pens and a historic rock ruin, and many places to build a new lodge or headquarters. Habitat The landscape consists of one-half foothills to the Glass Mountains and the other half deep-soil bottom land. This ranch lies at an elevation that supports a mix of vegetation from the mid-Chihuahuan Desert such as century plants, Spanish dagger, yucca, agarita, sotol and cholla, with a dominant gramma grass mix and scattered bush/trees, including creosote, mesquite, hackberry, and soap berry. Native grasslands provide excellent forage for livestock as well as habitat for Mule Deer and native birds and mammals. The ranch also has several ridges and hills rich in a diversity of rocks and minerals, including many types of agates. Wildlife This is Chihuahuan Desert grassland and scrubland at its very best. The grasses, forbs and brush provide excellent habitat for game and non-game animals and birds. Mule Deer and Elk are the primary game animals. Coyotes, javelina, bobcats, and badgers are all also present. Blue (Scaled) Quail and Doves are the game birds. Raptors include Golden Eagles and wide variety of hawks, neotropical migratory birds, such as orioles, hummingbirds, warblers, flycatchers, and many others make for a wonderful birding experience. Water The ranch lies over a tremendous freshwater aquifer, both shallow and deep. There are three windmills, one solar pump, two generator pumps, and one electric submersible. Water is distributed to several storage tanks and water troughs for wildlife and livestock. Development of irrigated alfalfa and other wildlife forage could greatly enhance the Deer and Elk populations. The water and soils are there, and with gas wells on the ranch, natural gas pumps could provide the energy needed to develop the irrigated cropland component. Minerals This ranch is located within the newly discovered Alpine High geologic region of West Texas. There are active well sites within eyesight of the ranch today both west and south which used horizontal technology in nontraditional shale zones. Seller has access to 3D Seismic that covers the entire ranch and can be made available with the purchase. The older traditional wells on the ranch have been and are being cleaned up and plugged, leaving clean and orderly remaining production facilities. There is one shut-in well on Section 34 with a two-year lease term and a 1/4th royalty. The remainder of the ranch is unleased. There is also a surface use agreement over the ranch, covering gas and water line rights-of-way and saltwater disposal operations. The Seller owns 25% of the Fee Minerals which includes executive rights and will convey all that they own or approximately 2,269.88 Net Mineral Acres. Additionally, there are also 3,098.10 acres of Mineral Classified state minerals on the ranch. Rarely do you get a chance to own minerals in an area where a single future lease could be an economic game changer. Activity and Current Condition of Oil and Gas Minerals 1) Ranch contains 9,079.5 gross mineral acres total, and Seller (Blackbeard Resources, LLC) has 25% of minerals. Buyer will receive Seller’s mineral interest, which equates to 25% of total, or approximately 2,269.88 net mineral acres. All minerals are currently unleased except for 704 acres around a shut-in gas well. a) The ranch is located in the prolific Delaware Basin and offsets Apache’s Alpine High Play b) The stratum consists of a 6,000’ hydrocarbon column with 3rd Bone Spring, Wolfcamp, Penn., Barnett, and Woodford formations with stacked oil, wet gas, and dry gas potential c) Offset development has drastically increased since Apache announced the play in September 2016 with drilling activity within 5 miles of the ranch’s borders 2) An additional 3,098 net acres are classified as “Mineral Classified” by State of Texas a) Most recent oil and gas lease on mineral classified land was in 2011 on about 3,058 acres for $500/ac, 3-year term and 25% royalty. That lease is now expired, and lands are available for a new lease. b) Mineral classified lands have minerals owned by the State of Texas. Surface owner of the land acts as agent for the State and equally shares the lease bonus and royalty with the State. Buyer will receive all the benefits due to surface owner on mineral classified lands. 3) Historical gas production from wells on Alpine High Ranch minerals is about 8,300,000 MCF, (where 1 MCF = 1,000 cu ft of gas). Productive wells on adjacent lands to the south add another 9,500,000 MCF. The vast majority of gas production is from the Devonian reservoir at depth of about 13,000 ft. 4) The previous owner Abraxas acquired a proprietary 3D seismic survey covering about 39 square miles in 2001. Seller of the ranch will grant a license to this seismic data to a new Purchaser. Abraxas utilized the 3D seismic data to successfully drill horizontal wells on closed structures. Some structures remain untested.