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$22,080,684  •  46,485.65 acres
About an hour’s drive west of Albuquerque, N.M., the Lobo Ranch spreads across 46,485± deeded acres of stunningly beautiful landscape marked by large mesas, rock formations, sandstone bluffs, expansive grasslands and open valleys. This working cattle ranch has outstanding recreational and historical attributes, including abundant wildlife and plentiful habitat, and hundreds of archeological sites and ancient petroglyphs. With elevations that range from approximately 6,100 feet to more than 8,200 feet above sea level, the ranch encompasses several distinct ecosystems that are home to a variety of wildlife from Rocky Mountain Elk, mule deer and Barbary sheep to black bears, mountain lions, quail, turkey and upland birds. Seasonal pastures with excellent winter range along the southern and eastern valley slopes favor both cattle and elk. The current owner grazes approximately 300 animal units in an operation that is biased toward wildlife and range preservation. Improvements include a 3,700-square-foot guest lodge with a large porch and patio with outdoor fireplace, a bunkhouse, manager’s residence, barns, equipment shop and a helicopter hanger. The ranch is accessible year-round via Cibola County Road 1, a county-maintained gravel road, north of Interstate 40 at the Laguna Interchange. The Facts • 46,485± deeded acres adjacent to the Marquez Wildlife Area • 55 miles west of Albuquerque, N.M. • Slightly more than an hour from Sunport, Albuquerque’s International Airport • 53 miles from Grants, N.M., and Grants Municipal Airport • Located on Cibola County Road 1, 15 miles north of Interstate 40 at the Laguna Interchange • Elevation 6,100 ft to 8,200 ft above sea level • Situated in Cibola (95%) and Sandoval Counties Improvements • The Lodge, 3,700± s.f. with 4 bedrooms, 3 baths • The Bunkhouse, 1,512± s.f. with 3 bedrooms, 1.5 baths • Manager’s residence, Modular home with 2 bedrooms, 1 bath • Equipment Shop, 3,000± s.f. • Hay Barn, 3,900± s.f. • Helicopter hangar, 40’ x 50’ • Horse barn, 1,120± s.f. Water • 20 water wells, including 4 solar powered pumps (quarterly meter reports) through four year period ends in July file for extension • 290 acre feet annually of unperfected water rights • 25 miles of water pipeline • Numerous earthen stock tanks Wind, Solar and Minerals • All mineral rights currently held by owner convey • NextEra Energy operates a wind farm on a high mesa in the northeastern part of the ranch via a lease agreement with Lobo Partners, LLC • Public Service Company of New Mexico owns and operates a 116.05-acre solar farm on the ranch Airports • About 55 miles from Albuquerque Sunport International Airport • 53 miles from Grants Municipal Airport • Dirt airstrip on property approximately 2,600’ X 80’ - small aircraft usage
$3,200,000  •  34,301 acres
Apache Gap Ranch Apache Gap is a high desert ranch located approximately 30-minutes southeast of Interstate 25 and Truth or Consequences in Sierra County, New Mexico.  The 34,300 +/- acre property is fully-contiguous and comprised of 1,936 deeded acres, a 6,153-acre State grazing lease and a 26,212-acre BLM lease.  Carrying capacity for the property is rated at 275 head with current ownership running a mixed Angus and Charolais herd.  With nearly 60 lineal miles of well-maintained interior and exterior fencing, the ranch provides (5) large pastures (8-11 sections each) and (7) smaller traps for flexible rotation.  Water distribution is impressive, consisting of an extensive network of underground pipeline and storage tanks with a combined storage capacity of approximately 150,000 gallons.  In addition, there are (2) domestic wells serving headquarters, (5) windmills and numerous dirt tanks and drinkers strategically placed throughout.  Elevations range from 4,800 feet in the bottomland pastures to about 7,600 feet near the summit of Timber and Brushy Mountains along the western perimeter of the ranch.  The ranch provides spectacular views from the upper elevations of both Caballo Lake and the Elephant Butte Reservoir State Parks (see descriptions below).  Wildlife Mule deer are common throughout the upper mountain pastures with herds of antelope in the lower portions of the property.  Desert Big Horn Sheep also range along the rocky cliff areas of the Caballo Mountains on the far western periphery.  Free-range gemsbok/oryx, javelina, coyotes, foxes, mountain lion, and the occasional black bear, also frequent the ranch.  Dove and coveys of quail can often be found at the various water holes. *New for 2019 – Pronghorn Antelope licenses can now be purchased over-the-counter through Game and Fish locations or licensed vendors.  Licenses are valid on private deeded land wherein landowner permission has been granted. Improvements Headquarters are located in the north-central portion of the ranch at the base of the Caballo Mountain range.  The primary residence consists of an 1,800 square foot ranch-style home of a three-bedroom, two-bath design.  Amenities include a stone fireplace, utility/storage room, covered porches and a large fenced yard encircled by shade and various fruit trees.  The bunkhouse consists of a 1,000 square foot two-bedroom, one-bath adobe structure with log and tile interior accents. The ranch also includes hay and implement storage barns, large cattle holding yard, working pens, round corral, chutes and a scale. Recreation Elephant Butte lake is New Mexico’s largest at nearly 40,000-acres and contains (2) marinas.  Boat and personal watercraft rentals are available.  The lake provides miles of beaches, hiking trails and views in all directions.  In addition to the surrounding sights, Elephant Butte is a well-known fishery containing some of the largest white and black bass, stripers, crappie, catfish and walleye in the southwest region. Located 20-miles downstream from Elephant Butte is the 11,000-acre Caballo Reservoir, which is similarly fed by the Rio Grande River.  Caballo Reservoir is also recognized as a good bass, catfish, crappie and walleye fishery with boat docks and ramps. Summary Apache Gap Ranch is the opportunity to own a time-tested working cattle operation that can also be utilized in tandem as a sporting retreat.  The utility of the ranch has constantly been improved and maintained over the years as evidenced by the water availability and rotational grazing practices.  Call Brent Hedrick or Greg Liddle for a qualified showing.  Co-brokers welcome.
$42,250,000  •  8,480 acres
The Jessen Farm of Western Nebraska is a very productive 11,680 acre irrigated and dryland farm containing 8,480 deeded acres plus 3,200 school land leased acres. Located in Perkins and Chase County near Grant, Nebraska, is some of the most highly sought after farmland in the Midwest.  Good water, excellent soils and good access to markets makes this a very rare offering.    The farm contains 1,627 deeded acres of center pivot irrigated cropland ( under 13 center pivots), 6,853 deeded acres of dry cropland including 31 acres of building sites. There are 3 homes, 4 large metal buildings, multiple grain storage facilities that hold over 380,000 bushels, utility sheds and more.    FARMING Tracts of farm ground are located within a 15 minute region and include excellent pivots, water and close proximity to five grain elevators on the railroad, which give competitive bids for grain.  The area also has several feedlots to where you can contract silage, hay and grain.  There is an ethanol plant at Madrid that also buys corn.  These elevators and feedlots are in a thirty-five mile radius of the farm.  This area is also an excellent area to set up a cattle feeding operation.  You could grow your own silage, hay and grain to feed your own cattle or start a custom feeding operation.  You can buy wet distillers grain from the Madrid ethanol plant.  The farm is centrally located between three major beef packing plants.  This area of Nebraska raises several million bushels of grain each year and the close location to markets make this an ideal location to feed cattle.  The Jessen Farm currently sells 5,000 tons of dry matter per year to the Oshkosh Dairy Heifer Development at Oshkosh, Nebraska. Northwest of Imperial, Nebraska or 20 miles south of the Headquarters there is a 7,000 head organic Dairy being built.  There is a plan to expand this operation in the future. This farm also has the potential to be converted into an organic farm operation.  With deep fertile soils, local access to manure and compost, good irrigation and good rainfall this farm is highly suited for organics.  "The Jessen Farm is one of the best operations I have ever seen.  Its property runs from Northwest Chase County to Western Perkins County.  It is comprised of level dryland and quality irrigated fields.  It is almost wheat harvest time, and the crops are some of the best I have seen.  The improvements are in great shape and all of the machinery is clean and the operation is very well run." IMPROVEMENTS There are five building sites on the Jessen farm. The headquarters features a “home place” second to none in the area.  It is located 1 mile west of Grant, Nebraska and features a beautiful custom built home with four car attached garage and a metal shop building, which would be very impressive anywhere in farm country. Leading into the headquarters and to the shop and garage is a rare black granite driveway made from rock imported from Wyoming.  The headquarters is located in part of the NW 1/4 of Section 15, T10N, R39W, Perkins County. The custom home is a single level 2,891 SF home built in 2010. The exterior is brick, stucco, and over 12” ICF concrete walls with Heritage asphalt shingles. All windows and most doors are Pella brand. The house has geo thermal heating and cooling which comes from plastic coils in the 12’ deep pond in back yard. The interior consists of carpet and ceramic tile flooring with painted dry wall. Rooms include a master bedroom with bathroom and walk-in closet, 2 bedrooms, office, kitchen, dining room, living room and 1.5 bathrooms. The interior walls are made of 2"x6" construction and are 12’ to 14’ high. Other amenities of the home include knotty alder trim and cabinetry, granite counter tops in the kitchen, fireplace in the living room, and ceiling mounted surround sound speakers in the house and patio. Excluding the bathrooms, there are large wall-mounted TV screens in every room of the house, including the garage and the patio. The cabinets, appliances, and sinks in the kitchen are state of the art. There is a 649’ ft patio on the east side of the home by the pond. From this patio you have a spectacular view of the surrounding fields and countryside. The 36’x60’ (2,160’ ft) attached garage has four electric overhead doors, 12” ICF concrete walls, full cement floor, custom-built cabinetry, finished, heated and cooled geo thermally. The cement driveway in the front of the house can be heated geo thermally to melt ice and snow. All the furniture, appliances, dishes, and silverware stay with the home. The owners are only taking their clothes and some personal pictures. This home comes fully furnished and equipped. It is ready for the new owners to move in.  There is 84’x100’ Chief metal shop building built in 2010. It has full concrete floor, fluorescent lights and ceiling fans, floor drain, 110 and 220 volt electrical service,  bathroom, heated and cooled geo thermally, and insulated. It has two 20’x14’ high electric overhead doors in the south wall and a 20’x14’ high electric overhead door in the west wall. This building is set up for two RV motor home hookups inside the shop and one outside. These hookups are complete with water, sewer, and electricity. There are cement aprons in front of the garage doors. The driveway and area in front of the shop is covered with 3/4 inch crushed black granite rock. This shop is fully equipped with tools and supplies which go with the farm. This home and shop are state of the art, and head and shoulders above what you will find on most farm properties. A lot of time, money, detail, and effort went into planning and building this house and shop. You really need to see this place for yourself to be able to appreciate all the workmanship that went into building this place.  The second site is located in the SW 1/4 of Section 3, T10N, R40W, Perkins County. Building improvements include (2) metal buildings, an open front storage shed and 191,000 bushels of grain bin storage. The 80’x200’ metal shop building was built in 2004. It is full concrete floor, fluorescent lights, ceiling fans, 110 and 220 electrical service, and has a 80’x75’ shop area that is insulated with floor heat. There is a 21’x25’ finished office with full bathroom and studio apartment over the office. There is a 40’x20’ bi-fold door in the east wall, two 22’x20’ high electric overhead doors in the south wall, and a 40’x200’ long open front lean-too on the south side of the building. There is a cement loading dock on the south east corner of the shop building to load and unload equipment. There is a large sliding door on the west wall of the heated shop that opens into the machinery storage area that is not heated. All office equipment, full line of shop tools, all spare parts, and shop supplies are included in the sale of the Jessen farm. They have an extensive amount of supplies and equipment in the shop including their own hydraulic hose maker and a very large steam cleaner. The bathroom has a washer and dryer for the apartment. This is a state of the art farm shop with plenty of shop space to keep the extensive line of equipment well maintained. There is a full line of farm equipment, including but not limited to: pickups, semi tractors, and trailers that are part of the purchase of the Jessen farm. There is 80’x175’ open front machinery storage building built in 2009. It has electrical service and a coal ash floor. There is a 39’x71’ metal building built in 1975. It is full concrete floor with 110 and 220 volt electrical service, fluorescent lights, and is fully insulated with radiant heat. It has a 20’x12’ high overhead door in the east wall. This building is mainly used to store a Case IH 4440 row crop sprayer during the winter. It is also used for chemical and seed storage.  Grain storage at this site includes 191,000 bushels. There are three 9,000 bu grain bins built in 1970’s. They have full air floors and 8 inch unload augers and were recently painted and sealed. There are two 1,000 bu cone bottom bins, a 40,000 bu grain bin with 10 inch unload auger, two 36,000 bu bins with 10 inch unload, one 30,000 bu bin with 8 inch unload, one 20,000 bu bin with 8 inch unload auger.  There is fuel storage at this site. The third site is located in part of the SE1/4SE1/4 of Section 36, T11N, R40W, Perkins County.  It has a 1,360 SF home built in 1927. It has 4 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms with a partially furnished basement. There is a 40’x48’ wood frame utility building built around 1950 with full concrete floor and 110 volt electrical service.  The fourth site is located in the SW1/4 of Section 15, T11N, R41W, Perkins County and has a 1,343 SF 1.5 story house built around 1923. The house has 4 bedrooms and 1 bathroom and a partially finished basement. There is a 39’x64’ wood and steel frame utility building built around 1968 with full concrete floor and 110 volt electrical service. The fifth site is located in part of the SE1/4 of Section 9, T7N, R40W, Chase County. It has a 60’x100’ metal shop building built in 1978. The building has a full concrete floor, 110 and 220 electrical service, radiant heat, and 25’x25’ attached office with a bathroom. There is a 68’x115’ quonset built in 1982 with full concrete floor. It is used for machinery storage but was originally used for grain storage (80,000 bu). This building has no electrical service. Grain bins at this site include one 40,000 bu bin built in 1986, Two 11,000 bu bins, one 26,000 bu bin, and ten 10,000 bu bins. All the bins were built in the 70’s and 80’s, and are equipped with partial air floors and 8 inch unload augers. There is a 1,000 bu cone bottom with a small grain dryer at this site. There is 189,000 bu of grain storage at this site. LOCATION Just 30 minutes from famous Lake McConaughy and nearby Ogallala situates the farming operation near popular recreational destinations and strong farming country.  Grant, Nebraska has a population of 1,165 people and is the county seat of Perkins County. A new high school was built in Grant a few of years ago and so was a new addition to the hospital.  They have also expanded the airport to handle small jets.  Doctors and other medical specialists fly into Grant on a regular basis to provide medical care to patients.  This is an excellent area to raise a family.  Neighboring towns of Imperial and Holyoke are similar and offer excellent services as well and are located within 30 minutes.  Chase and Perkins County have an average of 19-20 inches of precipitation a year in the form of rain, sleet and snow. Approximately 80% falls in a six month period from April through September making it a ideal grain production farm. This precipitation usually occurs in the form of rain. The other 20% of precipitations usually occurs in the form of freezing rain and snow. The annual snow fall amount is 31 inches. The improvements on the property are well kept and very serviceable.  In short, I believe this is one of the best properties, when judged by the lay of the land, condition and quality of the soils and improvements, and farming practices that I have ever seen.  I am proud and honored to have the Jessen’s entrust our company with the marketing of this property.
$2,700,000  •  7,697 acres
Fence Lake Ranch Spanning 7,697± deeded acres, Fence Lake Ranch sits in the heart of New Mexico Game Management Unit (GMU) 12 and just 8 miles north and east of the community of Fence Lake. This unimproved acreage is comprised of diverse terrain with rolling ridges and draws, rock outcroppings, seasonal playas, and open grass pastures. Ample cover for wildlife is found throughout in the form of dense stands of pinon pine, juniper, and cedar. Dirt tanks and a small number of windmills provide water for livestock and wildlife. The ranch is home to elk, mule deer, and pronghorn, and is located in a portion of GMU 12 that is known for producing trophy animals. Portions of the ranch are perimeter fenced and internal roads provide access throughout. Unencumbered by conservation easements, this property represents a unique opportunity to acquire a quality hunting and grazing property that can be operated or configured to suit. Fence Lake Ranch is 2 hours and 20 minutes from Albuquerque and 1 hour and 30 minutes from Grants and the I-40 corridor. The community of Quemado is a 45 minute drive to the south.
$4,300,000  •  6,070 acres
Majestic mesas, a familiar landmark of southwestern New Mexico, covered in pinon, juniper, and cedar, along with open meadows of gramma grass and wildflowers make up the terrain and landscape of Blue Hills Elk Ranch. Spectacular sunrises over the Sawtooth Mountains in the wee hours of the morning, distant views of the snowcapped, 11,300 foot, Mount Taylor in the winter months, along with the anticipation of seeing elk, antelope, mule deer, predators, small game, and a variety of feathered friends enhance the surroundings of Blue Hills Elk Ranch, making each day an adventure in itself.Blue Hills Elk Ranch is located at a comfortable elevation of 7,200 feet, between Pie Town and Grants, in New Mexico’s largest county, Catron County. Situated in Game Management Unit 12 the ranch received 5 highly coveted rifle elk tags. Healthy gramma grass and numerous drinkers provide feed and water for 70 to 80 AUM year-round on approximately 5,430 acres of deeded lands and 640 acres of state leased lands.Unique to hunting in southwestern New Mexico, the Blue Hills Elk Ranch typically receives 5 rifle elk permits annually. Several trophy bulls scoring over 375 have been taken in Unit 12 over the past several years, and no doubt others will be taken in years to come. Other hunting in the area, and on the ranch, includes mountain lion, black bear, coyotes, and other small game species.Historically Blue Hills Elk Ranch runs a minimum of 70 to 80 cows year round, although this number can increase to 100 with good precipitation. The ranch is divided into 4 pastures with good water distribution throughout. The north portion of the ranch has one well and storage tank, and 2 dirt tanks. Natural lakes in the northeast corner provide additional water for livestock and wildlife. A very good, 480 foot well on the south portion of the ranch is solar powered with a 220 horse submersible pump. It supplies a 5,000 gallon water storage tank and pipeline to 3 large rubber tire tanks in 3 separate pastures. The south portion of the ranch has 2 dirt tanks.Heading north from The Blue Hills Elk Ranch to Grants and I-40 takes approximately 45 minutes and from I-40 east to Albuquerque takes approximately 1 hour. The famous little community of Pie Town is about 30 minutes south of Blue Hills Elk Ranch.Blue Hills Elk Ranch experiences four splendid seasons. Rocky red bluffs covered in winter snow, the early warmth of spring, sudden summer thunderstorms, and fall pastures of green grass and wildflowers exemplify the beauty of Blue Hills Elk Ranch. Located in a semi-arid climate, the ranch receives an annual precipitation of 11 inches. Average high temperatures are in the 70’s and average low temperatures are in the 30’s with the sun shining 275 to 300 days a year.Over 6,000 acres of magnificent country with scenic views in all directions, terrain that ranges from grassy meadows to rocky bluffs and rolling pinon juniper covered mountains, 5 rifle elk tags in an excellent hunting area, and the capacity to run a minimum of 70 to 80 cows year round, amounts to a fantastic ranch with a multitude of surrounding beauty and recreational opportunity.
$917,000  •  5,747 acres
Blue Creek 160 with Allotment (5587 Acres) Located in the very heart of the Gila National Forest, the Blue Creek 160 acre inholding, combined with an adjacent +/- 5578 acres national forest grazing allotment, permitted for 145 pair year-round, is virtually impossible to duplicate.  5 miles from the Arizona border, located in Grants County, New Mexico this property carries bull elk that reach gigantic proportions, mule deer that die of old age, Coues Whitetails, bear & turkey. The property features +/-5 waterholes and one well (solar).  There are no improvements, with the exception of working pens, on this secluded deeded holding.  A road maintained by the National Forest Service allows access to the deeded 160 with two tracks accessing the national forest.  Deer, elk and cattle income!  It’s a great place for a cabin or RV and very accessible to the state of Arizona that could take 20 years to draw a tag. These national forest inholdings are getting more and more scarce so call or email today for more info and a qualified showing.  Hunting rights convey for 2019 season.   
$15,475,200  •  5,176 acres
The Wegener Farm is located across Western Perkins and Northwest Chase Counties in Western Central Nebraska,  with it’s headquarters situated in Venango.  This magnificent farm is a dryland operation containing 5176 acres spread over a 23 mile area.   In short, this is amazing farm country. The farm headquarters includes a 1,650 sq. foot brick home with double attached garage, basement, and upstairs. The insulated shop is 60’x100’ and heated with office, bathroom, and shower. The machinery storage building is steel frame 250’x120’ and has 2 large overhead doors. There is a 60’x100’ insulated curvet building with large overhead door, a 50’x 80’ building for storage with large overhead door with a gravel floor, and a 50’x20’ utility building with dirt floor. There are 3 new 50,000 BU grain bins with full aeration floors and 10 inch unload augers.  Mike Wegener has spent 15 +/- years gathering up these highly productive properties,  purchasing only excellent, level dryland.  He states that he “ …began with 2 quarters and 1 hired man and now farms 35 quarters and still has 1 hired man.”  He says that “…it’s time to slow down”. Venango has impressive bragging rights of loading more railroad cars of grain than any elevator in the nation. There are five grain elevators on the railroad that are in close vicinity to the farm which give competitive bids for grain. The area also has several feedlots where you can contract silage, hay and grain, and there is an ethanol plant at Madrid that also buys corn and where you can buy wet distillers grain.  These elevators and feedlots are in a thirty five mile radius of the farm.  This area is also an excellent area to set up a cattle feeding operation.  You could grow your own silage, hay and grain to feed your own cattle or start a custom feeding operation.   The farm is centrally located between three major beef packing plants.  This area of Nebraska raises several million bushels of grain each year and the close location to markets make this an ideal location to feed cattle.  In addition, northwest of Imperial, Nebraska, just 20 miles southeast of the Headquarters, there is a 7000 head organic Dairy being built that is planning to expand it’s operation in the future.  This farm also has the potential to be converted into an organic farm operation.  With deep fertile soils, local access to manure and compost, and good rainfall, this farm is highly suited for organics.  Located less than an hour from famous Lake McConaughy, and nearby Ogallala situates the farming operation near popular recreational destinations and strong farming country.  Grant, Nebraska which is the county seat of Perkins County, is a short 20 minutes east of Venago, and has a population of 1165 people.  They built a new high school a couple of years ago and a new addition to the hospital.  They have also expanded the airport to handle small jets.  Doctors and other medical specialists fly into Grant on a regular basis to  provide medical care to patients.  This is an excellent area to raise a family.  Neighboring towns of Imperial and Holyoke are similar and offer excellent services as well and are located within 30 minutes.  The opportunities are endless!
$6,704,800  •  4,624 acres
The ± 4,624-acre Jacalon Ranch, located about 20 minutes from Hebbronville on the southeastern corner of Webb and northeastern corner of Zapata counties, is the South Texas ranch that wildlife enthusiasts dream of. The low-fenced ranch, surrounded by sprawling historic ranches, is home to exceptional whitetail and quail (both bobs and blues) hunting. Dove and waterfowl are abundant in their seasons. Thriving wildlife populations are a combination of exceptional habitat and effective, conscientious game management. The Jacalon Ranch, that traces its beginnings to the Jose Vasquez Borrego Spanish land grant issued in the 1760s, benefits from both. The trophy whitetail herd is managed under a MLD Level III Permit. For the past six seasons, limited hunting pressure has been applied. The diverse soil (Brundage Fine Sandy Loam, Copita Fine Sandy Loam, Hebbronville Loamy Fine Sand, Maverick-Catarina Complex, Zapata-Outcrop Complex and Gently Undulating) produces diverse vegetation delivering a natural buffet of high-energy, high-protein browse and forbs that grow robust animals. It is a rare ranch that encompasses so much diverse soil, topography and habitat. The Jacalon Ranch is in an ecological transition zone marked by the Bordas Escarpment that runs through the upper portion of the ranch. It brings together the famous red sandy country, brush motts and savannah grasslands of the Coastal Plains with the rolling hills and flatlands typical of this region of South Texas. Thanks to the escarpment the ranch also offers stunning views. On clear days, you can see Mexico’s Sierra Madre Mountains—and they’re 125 miles away. Even the strongest habitat can’t support wildlife without water. Fortunately, the Jacalon Ranch delivers with four wells, 7 stock tanks, and several creeks distributed throughout. A windmill, located near the ranch entrance, pulls from a well at 200 feet. Two more newly drilled wells that hit water at 400 feet are in the same general area and offer 4,500 gallons of storage. These wells, which flow at approximately 10 – 15 gpm each, have excellent quality drinking water. The fourth well, near the center of the ranch, extends 1,050 feet deep and provides water for wildlife, livestock and filling tanks at a rate of ± 40 gpm. FM 649 provides road frontage access to the ranch and its centerpiece, the Jacalon Ranch Lodge beautifully appointed with Spanish and Southwestern furniture and décor befitting its history and location. The lodge boasts 11 suites each with a private bath. The suites join the soaring two-story main building; the complex is equipped with telephone, high-speed internet and dish satellite. Designed to easily handle a crowd, the lodge includes a modern kitchen, a large dining room and bar area, a utility room and a full bath in the common area. Guests can enjoy a fire pit and an outdoor seating area in the midst of a native landscape oasis. A rain catchment system with an 8,000 gallon capacity helps meet water needs. To make coming and going even easier, the Jacalon Ranch Runway, a private/restricted 3,900 foot turf runway (TE89), is located adjacent to the lodge. Jim Hogg County Airport, with a paved and lighted 5,000 foot runaway, is 20 minutes away and the Laredo International Airport, which handles private and commercial flights, is 40 minutes away. The Jacalon Ranch is the stuff of a wildlife enthusiasts’ dreams—but it’s real. To experience the Jacalon Ranch for yourself, contact Howard W. Hood at 830-739-3815. Available for $1,450/acre.
$4,494,000  •  4,280 acres
Inscription Rock Ranch, El Morro National Monument, Cibola County NM Bordering the El Morro National Monument, Cibola County New Mexico, the Inscription Rock Ranch (+/- 4280 acres) is being offered for the first time since it’s been in the same family dating back to the late 1800’s.  The ranch is part of the original Mirabal Ranch holdings, originally +/- 387,000 acres that ran from Grants New Mexico to the Arizona state line.   Inscription Rock is a huge golden piece of sandstone rising from the Ponderosas & Pinion of the New Mexico high desert between Grants and Gallop NM. One of the Wests neatest National Monuments, this well kept secret abounds with history. The main feature of this National Monument is a great sandstone promontory with a pool of water at its base.  As a shaded oasis in the western U.S. desert, this site has seen many centuries of travelers. The remains of a mesa-top pueblo are atop the promontory where 1500 people lived in this 875-room pueblo sometime between 1275AD and 1350 AD.  The Spaniard explorers called it El Morro (The Headland). The Zuni Indians call it "A'ts'ina" (Place of Writings on the Rock). Anglo-Americans called it Inscription Rock. Travelers left signatures, names, dates, and stories of their treks. While some of the inscriptions are fading, there are still many that can be seen today, some dating to the 17th Century.  Bring your hiking shoes for the 2-mile hike to the pueblo. From there, you’ll look out over the adjacent +/- 4280 acres of the Inscription Rock Ranch. The ranch is very level, highly usable ground, with 360-degree views of the El Morro Inscription Rock Monument. The ranch is carrying an incredible resident elk herd with 10 landowner elk tags.  Bull elk to 400-inches have been documented in this immediate area and on the ranch and there are over-the-counter landowner mule deer tags, with bucks documented to 217-inches. The property is but a couple hundred yards to a paved highway, it borders a county road and has power on 2 sides.  It features a highly productive solar water well centrally located in the ranch and 2 stock ponds. Every arroyo has bull elk rubs and elk trails and the stock tanks are torn up with bull elk wallows.  There are no improvements to pay for as the ranch is vacant land with ranch roads throughout.  It’s traditional use has been a working ranch with elk and mule deer hunting being primary and cattle grazing secondary. The owned minerals will convey.   These Western New Mexico big game units are very accessible to Arizona, California and Utah and have very flexible elk seasons with landowner elk tags from September through December and over-the-counter landowner mule deer tags. The ranch is located within minutes of I-40 and the Albuquerque International airport is less than 2 hours.   Bring your hiking boots and enjoy the El Morro National Monument. Call or email today for a qualified showing or more information on the Inscription Rock Ranch, Cibola County NM.   
$95,000,000  •  3,790 acres
The Historic Veale Ranch is a very rare offering, available to only the best of land stewards and most savvy investors. This large working cattle ranch is unique because of its size and location in the area, and the ranch gate is only 11 miles west of downtown Fort Worth!
$3,662,400  •  3,611 acres
Sawmill Creek Ranch +/- 3022 Deeded Acres Bordering the Gila National Forest, the +/- 3022 deeded acres plus 589 leased acres of the Dripping Springs Allotment of the Saw Mill Creek Ranch in Grant County, New Mexico may just be the land investment you’ve been looking for.  With a year-round live creek and 3 solar wells, this well- timbered parcel of the Y6 Ranch has never been on the market in its history. The well-watered canyons and mesas have maintained cattle for generations and is in a great position to become the game producing mecca you’ve longed for.   A ranch with grazing income!  Low Taxes!  Incredible water and game!  A county-maintained road accesses this secluded parcel consisting of end-to-end live creek framed by cottonwoods and massive oaks and dripping springs feeding rocky pools that run year round.  Native grass meadows, alligator bark junipers, pinions, ponderosa pines and more.  And did I mention massive oaks!!!  The ranch carries unlimited landowner elk and mule deer tags, with Coues Whitetail, javelina, turkey and bear along with quail, lion, bobcat and coyote as a bonus.  Located against the Arizona border, BGU 23, the regulations allow for unlimited landowner deer and elk tags (check regulations).   The Gila is noted for producing some World Class trophy size elk, large mule deer and some very nice Coues Whitetails.  This parcel has been the underutilized parcel of a much larger ranch that has been in the same family for generations.  Should the buyer be interested in maintaining the very low tax ag status, the family would be interested in continuing a leased grazing and care-taking arrangement.   Dripping Springs Allotment is an additional +/-589 acres Gila National Forest Grazing Lease adjacent to the deeded acreage that allows for 24 cattle pair to be grazed 6 months a year, for just a few dollars a year.  The property is currently undergoing surveying and fencing.  Actual acreage may vary.    Sawmill Creek Ranch, while being secluded, has 3 good wells and is accessed via county maintained road. The Sawmill Creek Ranch has gorgeous canyons, creek bottom, large meadows and a couple dirt tanks but is wide open for some additional game management.  Bull elk rubs abound up and down the canyon.  No improvements currently exist so your investment is totally in the land.  The ranch is off-grid and within a half mile of power, but it would be best served by solar.   The locations for your hidden cabin or home are too many to count.  Incredible weather, scenic 360-degree views, untouched flora and fauna, teeming with wildlife, what more could you ask for?  Close proximity to Tucson, Phoenix and California make this a great getaway. Virgin holdings such as the Sawmill Creek Ranch /Drippings Springs Grazing Allotment are almost non-existent today.  Call or email Greg Liddle for additional information and a qualified showing. Co Brokers Welcome!       
$4,800,000  •  3,200 acres
Located 40 miles North of Taos, New Mexico the deeded 3,200-acre San Pedro Mesa Ranch was within the 1925 Sangre De Cristo grant, just northeast of Costilla New Mexico. Within an easy drive to the 83-mile loop of the renowned Enchanted Circle going through mountains, valleys, mesas and national forest all unique to Northern New Mexico; where culture and outdoor recreation are abundant. This hunting property shares a border with the state of Colorado.
$12,400,000  •  2,778.93 acres
The 2780 acre Fountain Ranch is what one envisions if it were somehow possible to put together every essential element of a Class A ranch under one umbrella to create the most idyllic picture of ranch perfection; gentle oak strewn hills rolling down to irrigated pasture land that hug the shores of a mighty river while being towered over by timbered peaks and dramatic rock outcroppings all while being complimented by aesthetically appealing and functional improvements. This within close proximity to the San Francisco Bay Area. Of course, a natural rarity of this magnitude was not lost on the past generations. The history of the Fountain Ranch is a microcosm of the history of California itself. Steeped in the ancient folklore of Native Americans, the Ranch’s Frog Woman Rock is the origin of some of these native people’s most fabled tales. Ascending high above the Russian River with its full omnipresences, it is not hard to conjure up images of native people toiling and worshipping under such sheer magnificence in what could have only been the land of seamlessly endless natural bounties. In the 1800’s, the Spanish recognizing the natural richness of the region, created the Sanel Land Grant and deeded the same to one Señor Fernando Feliz. Sometime thereafter a grand Victorian was built on the Ranch’s north side. This went on first to serve as a stopover for the wagon trail coming off of Mountain House Road, then later as the Fountain Ranch Train Station for the North Pacific Railroad and finally as the Ranch’s Headquarters. Still in one dim lit upstair’s room stands the grand bed that President William McKinley slept in on his tour through the region in the late 1890’s. This Regal Lady cries out a storied past filled with colorful characters and scenes of yesteryear and awaits the next Owner’s visions of revival. The current era began in 1952 when Fountain Ranch was purchased by G.P. Bradford, the grandfather of the current Owners. G.P. Bradford’s son, the late Robert Bradford, can be credited for the extensive infrastructural improvements on the Ranch including the Lake House and Bradford Lake. Planning for the future, like an architect and engineer, Robert Bradford immersed himself in these projects and others with full attention to detail creating what can only be described as a living legacy. Under the stewardship of the Bradford Ranch Partnership,, a long time family business that was made up of first G.P. Bradford and Robert Bradford and then later Robert and his son Peter Bradford, the Ranch has been used primarily as a cattle ranch, hunting club and family retreat with attention focused on long term sustainability. The property is approximately 2,778.93 acres and is made up of 15 Legal Parcels (Certificates of Compliance) all under the Willamson Act’s Agricultural Preserve for lower tax liability. The bulk of the Ranch is gently rolling pasture land along with over a 150+ acres of irrigated pasture land. Interspersed in the higher regions are large rock outcroppings including Frog Women Rock and the Twin Peaks with the southern peak hosting the “Balancing Rock”, one very large boulder precipitously balanced on half buried rock. Surrounding these outcroppings are fir and hardwood forests. The Ranch is transversed by an internal road system in excellent order. Wildlife abounds on the Ranch including trophy class blacktail deer, wild hog, turkey, blue grouse, valley and mountain quail, mountain lion, bobcat, black bear and other species. Bradford Lake plays hosts to a wide variety of migratory waterfowl with many ideal spots for permanent blinds. In addition to its waterfowl attributes, Bradford Lake is an angler’s delight with 12 to15 pound Florida Strain Large Mouth Bass being a routine catch. RESIDENCES & OTHER STRUCTURES 1. The main residence, the Lake House, is approximately 5,000 sq. ft. and sits perched in a grove of majestic oaks and established gardens with panoramic views over the Lake. Designed and engineered by the late Robert L. Bradford, the House exemplifies modern sensibility and function while giving credence to its natural surroundings. There are 3 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, an office, a laundry room, kitchen and dining area, flower room, living room and a full basement. In addition, there is a covered heated pool connected to the Lake House. The House has its own solar power system generating enough power to support all domestic demands. Heating for both the House and the pool is by natural gas while the pool also has its own supplemental solar heating system. The House awaits updating and the vigor of a new Owner. 2. There are two other houses, one built in the 1990s and one built sometime before 1940. The older house is 1200 sq. ft. and was renovated in the 1990s. It has two bedrooms and one bath. The house built in 1990s is 1500 sq. ft. and has 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. These houses are far removed form the Lake House assuring privacy to the new Owner. Both houses currently house Ranch employees who are interested in the possibility of working for the new Owner. One employee has worked on the property for 33 years and the other has worked there for 13 years. 3. The oldest residence is the uninhabitable Grand Victorian built in the late 1880’s that functioned as stage stop, railroad station and residence until the 1990s. This house contains 6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, kitchen, dining room, living room, office and several other rooms. Though the foundation and internal structural supports appear to be salvageable, this house needs some major renovations to become habitable. 4. There is an apartment above the shop / equipment shed that has one bedroom, a bathroom and a kitchen. The apartment and shop were built in the 1990’s. The apartment has natural gas for kitchen and laundry use and is electrically heated and cooled by a mini heat pump. 5. There are two barns on the property for hay storage and there is a good corral setup for working livestock. There is also a registered weight scale for weighing livestock. WATER Fountain Ranch is blessed with an abundance of water the likes which are seldom found together on one property. With over 3.7 miles of interspersed frontage on the Russian River, a licensed appropriative right to directly divert 2.3 cubic feet per second from the river from March to November. State permitted and licensed dam creating the 440 acre feet Bradford Lake fed by an immense watershed, stock ponds and numerous smaller creeks, the Fountain Ranch stands in a class of itself. If water is gold in California, this ranch is a gold mine. CURRENT AND POTENTIAL USES For the past 70 years the ranch has been used primarily as a cattle ranch running approximately 70 to 80 mother cows, 90 bred heifers, 8 to 10 bulls with an additional 100 to 130 weaned heifer from spring to fall. This would be something the new Owner might continue on his own or lease out to another livestock producer. The Ranch leases the blacktail deer and wild pig hunting to a Hunting Club on a year to year basis. This has proven to be a long and mutually beneficial relationship for all parties. There is, however, substantial potential to increase revenue from the wildlife resources by instituting a PLM (Private Land Management) Program on the Ranch and more intensely managing and marketing the wildlife. In the alternative, the new owner could choose to maintain such resources for their personal recreational enjoyment. What seems like the most economically productive use of the Ranch with the highest potential return would be to use the existing water resources to plant a portion of the ranch to vineyards well simultaneously maintaining the cattle and hunting operation on the remainder. There is also a conservation easement potential on the Ranch because of its multiple parcels, location on the Russian River with critical water resources and its ownership of significant cultural landmarks. Such an easement could perhaps be done in conjunction with the before mentioned development. Property Highlights: • 2778.93 acres comprising 15 Legal Parcels (CC’s) all under the Williamson Act’s Ag Preserve for lower property taxes. • 150+ acres of irrigated pasture, 100’s of acres of gentle plantable ground • Water: With over 3.7 miles of interspersed frontage on the Russian River, a licensed appropriative right to directly divert 2.3 cubic feet per second from the river from March to November. State permitted and Licensed dam creating the 440 acre feet (22 surface acres) Bradford Lake fed by an immense watershed, stock ponds and numerous smaller creeks, the Fountain Ranch is well positioned to support large agricultural production. In addition, there are numerous springs. • 4 residences - one 5000 Sq. Ft. custom Lake House, Workers’ housing and guest apartment. Non-habitable Grand old Victorian that needs a major renovation. • Good perimeter fencing and some internal cross fencing. Working barn and corral with registered scale. • The home of the iconic Frog Woman Rock, aka “Squaw Rock” or “Lover’s Leap”, and the twin peaks with the “Balancing Rock” • No internal easement other than the Mountain House Road on the far western edge, railroad right away on far eastern edge near Russian River and utilities. Approached off of county road. Excellent internal road network - both year round and seasonal. • Substantial Conservation Easement Potential • $12,400,000
Reduced
$5,073,285  •  2,543 acres
$5,849,447
The Valdina Ranch is the house pasture of the historic Valdina Farms, located in the sought after transition country, where the hill country meets south Texas. Valdina Farms was an 18,000-acre ranch established in the early 1900’s by Mr. E.F. Woodward.
Contact for Price  •  2,416 acres
Set high on the Edwards Plateau in northwestern Kimble County, the C&N Ranch comprises plus-or-minus 2,416 acres of steep canyons, rolling hills, and savannas marked with native hardwood trees. Views across the hills and valleys of this property span for miles in all directions, and those beautiful hill country sunrises and sunsets provide an amazing display of the natural beauty that characterizes this area of the state. Located approximately 18 miles northwest of Junction, Texas, along FM 210, the ranch has over two and a half miles of road frontage. West Bear Creek meanders through the ranch for approximately 15,000 feet, carving through the limestone hills creating amazing vantage points and providing seasonal water, and depositing deep pools of water along the northeast corner of the ranch. The riparian area of this creek, which is a tributary to the North Llano River, is undisturbed and natural, creating an ecosystem rich in various species of flora and fauna that inhabit this land. Interesting rock formations, caves, and cliffs are found along the creek, and in other areas, the bed widens out, providing several interesting and beautiful landscapes along its path. Evidence of extensive clearing can be found throughout the property, and much of the cedar has been removed. The C&N is completely high-fenced and has been granted a Level 3 Managed Lands Deer Permit, allowing the harvesting of antlerless deer in an extended hunting season. Wildlife on the ranch includes a carefully managed herd of trophy whitetail, as well as Axis deer and turkey. Hunting blinds and feeders are located strategically throughout this expansive property. Three metal buildings with electricity, water well, and propane service anchor the hunting camp set atop the hills overlooking the winding creek bed. Sunsets and vistas from this point are awe-inspiring, and the back porch takes full advantage of these views, inviting owners, hunters, and guests to enjoy the great outdoors together on this spot. Exploring this land presents countless possibilities for the enjoyment of -- and recreation upon -- your very own hunting ranch. For your chance to tour this special property, contact duPerier Texas Land Man.
$16,000,000  •  1,833 acres
Under Contract
Property Description: 1833.536+/- acres with a HUGE PRIVATE 550+/- ACRE LAKE set amongst scenic rolling terrain heavily wooded in oak and elm forests. Clear right-of-ways, scenic elevation change and excellent building locations. Raw land with limited improvements allows for a blank canvas to with endless possibilities.Area Historical Information: McLennan County is deep seeded in history with the first Spanish exploring expedition in 1721 by Marques de San Miguel de Aguayo. Records show that during his expedition he camped near the Brazos River and a major tributary, Bosque, Spanish for woods.Multiple native Indian tribes lived and roamed the area and was occupied by three main tribes - Caddo, Tonkawa and three branches of the Wichita - Tawakoni, Towash and Waco. The Tonkawas were the most predominant in number and referred to as "Tonks" by the European settlers. They lived in skin tents and followed bison, deer and other small animals. They were considered to be roaming hunter/gatherers which provided for many conflicts by the neighboring Comanche to the west.Further settlement of the area began in 1837 when Fort Fisher, a Texas Ranger outpost, was established but abandoned a few months later. Waco Village was later built on the site of an ancient agricultural village of the Waco Indians. A two-league grant of land by Gen. Thomas J Chambers was the start of development in the area where land was sold for a dollar an acre. The Chisolm Trail later crossed at a shallow ford in the Brazos River where the town of Kimball was formed, west of Waco. In 1845, Neil McLennan moved onto land on the South Bosque River. In 1850, named after Neil McLennan, McLennan County was carved out of the Milam District and the same year Universal Immigration Company of England purchased 27,000 acres from Richard Kimball where 30 families were sent to settle the area. Bosque County was officially formed in February 1854 from McLennan County totaling 989 square miles. European settlers began to populate the area in 1854 when the State of Texas offered 320 acres to each family that would settle the new county, and Norwegians took advantage of the offer believing the area to be much like Norway. In 1856, Waco Village was incorporated as the town of Waco, and a new county courthouse was erected that year. By 1859, there were 749 people living in Waco.Location: Located in eastern McLennan County, Lake Creek Reservoir is on Manos Creek in the Brazos River basin approximately four miles west of Riesel, TX. It is located approximately 12 miles east of Waco, ~100 miles from Dallas/Fort Worth, ~110 miles from Austin & ~165 from Houston, Texas.Directions: From Waco, go East on Highway 6 toward Riesel. Prior to arriving in Riesel turn south on FM 1860 going approximately ~5 miles to the first main gate on the left. Just past this gate the lake can be partially seen on the left. FM 1860 continues around the ranch and ties back into Hwy 6 in Riesel, TX.Lake Creek Reservoir: This is a superior body of water constructed by Austin Road Company in 1953. There were no expenses spared at the time of construction. The water clarity is very good being in limestone based land. The lake is considered a magnificent recreational lake. There are 3 primary drainage basins with Manos Creek being the primary source of run-off water. The lake boasts multiple scenic coves, a magnificent tree covered island in the center of the lake, deep water shorelines and duck habitat in the backwaters of the lake making this an extremely versatile body of water in an area not known to have large lakes. Maximum depth is estimated to be ~35' at the deepest point with fourteen square miles of drainage feeding the lake. Based on aerial imagery from 2005-2015 the average water surface acreage was 442.475+/- acres with an average of 9.7+/- miles of lake frontage. Also based on aerial imagery, it is estimated that the lake fluctuated between ~343 surface acres and ~555 surface acres with only three of the last ten years being less than ~400 acres. Lake Creek is a desirable lake even at lower lake levels with some of the shorelines being gravel based and blossom with native grasses providing for a clean and scenic shoreline. Fluctuation of lake level is not believed to have any impact on the quality of the reservoir.Lake Dam History: A Water Right Permit dated May 10, 1951 was granted by the State Board of Water Engineers to Texas Power and Light for constructing the reservoir. Austin Road Company began construction on September 8, 1951 and the dam was completed May 1952. Impoundment of water began in June 1952 by runoff inflow from approximately 14 square miles. The first generating unit began commercial operation April 2, 1953. The dam is highly engineered and well-constructed with an estimated cost in 1952 of $10.8M. On January 26, 1972 the permitted water capacity was reduced from 9,500 acre-feet to its now current level of 8,500 acre-feet at 405 ft above msl. Lake Creek previously operated as a natural gas fired power plant which has since been completely removed and remediated. It was in operation from 1953 to 2010.Water rights:Impoundment limit - 8,500 acre feetPermitted Consumptive Rights - 10,000 acre feetMaximum Make-Up Water per year from the Brazos River - 8,996 acre feetWater is pumped via through a pipeline from a pump station located on the Brazos River in close proximity to the lake.Dam Report: Freese and Nichols, Inc conducted a dam inspection on July 18, 2017 and provided a report dated November 2017 of the Lake Creek Dam (a full report can be made available to pre-qualified Buyers). The following is the "Project Description":Lake Creek Dam was completed in 1952 to provide a cooling reservoir for the operation of Lake Creek Steam Electric Station. The dam consists of a homogenous, earthen embankment with a length of 1,860 feet and a maximum height of 50 feet above the original streambed. Based on the 2003 inspection report, the dam's crest elevation varies from 409.75 to 410.25 feet-msl. The normal pool of Lake Creek Reservoir is elevation 402 feet-msl. The embankment has side slopes of 2.5 Horizontal to 1 Vertical (2.5H:1V) for both the upstream and downstream slopes. The upstream slope of the embankment is protected by a 1-foot thick layer of rock riprap underlain by a 1-foot thick gravel bedding layer extending from the crest to elevation 395 feet-msl (seven feet below normal pool elevation). A 4-inch thick layer of gravel protects the downstream slope. Lake Creek Dam originally had no internal seepage collection system; however, a toe drain system consisting of a 6-inch perforated PVC pipe placed in a gravel filter and surrounded by filter fabric was installed in 2007 along the downstream toe of the embankment.Discharge from the reservoir are controlled by two 20-foot tall by approximately 32.75-foot wide radial gates at the left (south) abutment. The service spillway transitions into a 40-foot wide concrete chute, stilling basin, and outfall channel. The top elevation of the spillway gates is 405 feet-msl in the closed position, and the crest of the ogee weir at the gates is elevation 385 feet-msl. An uncontrolled earthen emergency spillway with a crest elevation of 406 feet-msl and a width of 523 feet is located in the right (north) abutment of the dam.In Texas, the TCEQ is the regulatory agency responsible for the administration of state dam safety laws. Dams are classified according to the size of the dam and the potential for loss of human life and property damages downstream from the dam in the event of a breach of the dam. The size classification of small, intermediate, or large is based on the storage in the reservoir and the height of the dam. Intermediate size dams are those with a maximum storage between 1,000 and 50,000 acre-feet and/or a height greater than 40 ft and less than 100 ft. With a height of 50 feet and a top of the dam storage of 11,700 acre feet Lake Creek Dam is classified as an intermediate size structure.A dam's hazard classification can be low, significant, or high based on the downstream risks in the event of a failure. The area downstream of the dam consists primarily of undeveloped land in the floodplain of Manos Creek. Farm-to-Market Road 1860 crosses the spillway discharge channel downstream of the dam. The confluence of Manos Creek and the Brazos River is located approximately 0.6 miles downstream of the dam. Based on a visual review there are a few scattered homes located downstream of the dam; however, they appear to be located at an elevation which would likely not be in the inundation zone. Farm-to-Market Road 1860 would be classified as a minor highway; however, since it was observed to be as a school bus route, it would be considered a secondary highway. TCEQ criteria define a significant hazard structure as one where failure can cause appreciable economic loss to isolated homes, secondary highways, minor railroads, and public utilities or which could potentially impact one to six lives or involve two or fewer habitable structures. Lake Creek Dam is currently classified as a significant hazard dam.According to State criteria, an intermediate size, significant hazard structure is required to pass 56 percent of the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) based on the height and storage parameters of Lake Creek Dam. As determined by an August 2013 hydraulic study performed by FNI, Lake Creek Dam passes 87 percent of the PMF event without overtopping the embankment. Therefore, the dam is considered hydraulically adequate.Inspection Summary Report: A full Freese & Nichols, Inc. report, dated November 2017, containing specific details in connection with minor repair recommendations can be made available to prequalified Buyers upon request.Terrain: Terrain is scenic with ~120' of elevation change. Property is mostly treed with sporadic native pastureland desirable for grazing cattle. The landscape lends itself to be considered recreational land. There are highly desirable scenic views/building sites from the southernmost hilltops overlooking Lake Creek Reservoir.Water Wells: There are two known water wells on the property. One water well is believed to be ~685 feet producing approximately 248 gallons per minute (gpm). The second well is believed to be approximately ~700 feet producing approximately 245 gallons per minute (gpm). Neither of the wells are believed to operational currently but there is no reason to believe they could not be put back into use.Other Surface Water: Several small ancillary stock tanks exist as well as one small lake being approximately 3.5+/- surface acres that is partially shared with a neighbor.Wildlife: Wildlife is an untouched and untapped resource. There are whitetail deer, abundant dove, feral hogs, squirrels, bobcats, coyotes, and a variety of songbirds. Migratory waterfowl have been seen in large numbers, have never been hunted and use the lake as a wintering ground during peak migration being located just off the banks of the Brazos River, being a major flyway in the Central Flyway.Fisheries: While Lake Creek has never officially been stocked there seems to be an abundance and wide variety of fish species that have naturally been stocked and reproduced in the lake. The fish that were caught and observed while filming were largemouth bass, catfish and bluegill. The fish habitat and lake appear to be prime for fish management and additional stocking/management.Fencing: The perimeter is fenced and there is no functional cross fencing. Condition of the fencing is fair to good. A 6' chain-link fence was constructed below the dam and has been well maintained and presently in very good condition.Access: There are ten (10) gated access points into the ranch, all are secure and the lake is virtually unused. There are multiple heavy duty pipe entrances into the ranch. Manos Creek can be crossed on the east end of the ranch via a well-constructed concrete three culvert crossing.Airports: There are two airports in close proximity Lake Creek Ranch. Waco Regional Airport (ACT) is a full service airport located 5+/- miles NW of Waco and 22+/- miles from the ranch. It is a Class 1 Airport averaging 98 aircraft per day with two (2) runways measuring 6,596' and 5,896'. Additionally, TSTC Waco Airport (CNW) is located 8+/- miles NE of Waco and 15+/- from the ranch. The airport averages 131 aircraft per day with two (2) runways measuring 8,600' and 6,291'. Former President George W. Bush landed Air Force One at TSTC when visiting their family ranch during his presidency.Hospitals: There are three full service hospitals located in close proximity to the ranch. Hill Regional Hospital, Providence Health Center, Hillcrest Baptist Medical Center all located in and around Waco, Texas.School District: Riesel ISDElectricity: Oncor Electric, and Navasota Valley Co-opMinerals: Minerals are negotiable. Owner is believed to own a majority of the minerals on the ranch, but no warranties or guarantees will be made.Grazing Leases: The ranch is currently leased for grazing and hay production. Fishing and hunting have been prohibited during the current ownership.Taxes: Annual property taxes for 2015 were approximately $17,851.73 and the property is agricultural exemptLegal Description: Estimated ~1833.536+/- acres in which a plat map and legal description of the property resulting from a boundary survey conducted in 2013 can be made available to prequalified Buyers.Buyers & Brokers: Buyer's brokers must be present for all initial showings. Buyers should notify Listing Broker that they are represented prior to touring the property. We welcome the opportunity to work with other Brokers/ Agents, but expect their full participation in any transaction.Comments: Rare opportunity to own a massive private lake in the heart of Central Texas close to Waco, TX and three major metropolitan areas.Contact:Cash McWhorter - Partner/Broker, 469-222-4076 MobileBlake Hortenstine - Partner/Broker, 214-616-1305 Mobile
$3,200,000  •  1,619 acres
RED CANYON RANCH, THERMOPOLIS, WYOMING “Think of it as your own National Park”   The epic story of Red Canyon Ranch begins when life on Earth almost died. Standing on the rim of Red Canyon and looking out over the beautiful vista, it’s hard to imagine that the dove-gray cliffs and rolling tree-covered hills in the canyon bottom represent the biggest mass extinction of all time. The limestone is formed of tiny shells, the dying sea creatures that drifted to the bottom of the ancient ocean. This was 250 million years ago, during what paleontologists call the Permian Extinction, a period when 90% of all life on Earth perished. But the dramatic red cliffs that rise above the gray limestone--the Chugwater Formation--date to around 200 million years ago and represent an Earth filled with oxygen and iron: the foundations for the rebirth of life. The geology of most of the ranch dates to the period when dinosaurs walked and flew, giant trees ruled, and the earth was flourishing, from around 175 million to 125 million years ago. Fossils are abundant and can be found on every high point. The ranch is a true “end of the road” property, with a single controlled access and consists of approximately 1,619 acres. Elevation runs from 4,900 feet to about 6,000 feet and averages 16 inches of precipitation a year. The views from the canyon rim are stunning, from the hundred-mile vista of the Big Horn Mountains to the variegated red, yellow, green, white, and tan strata in the canyon that hearkens to Moab and Sedona. The creeks in Red Canyon are filled with cottonwoods, willows, and cattails, while the uplands are covered in pines and junipers. In total, Red Canyon Ranch has 13 springs, and one spring-fed pond, which produce a combined flow of about 300 gallons of water per minute. All water rights and springs are fully adjudicated or permitted and the earliest date back to 1903--which some have referred to as “Million dollar water.” The 20-acre hay field is watered from the main spring through a gravity-fed pipeline and sprinkler system and additional acreage is permitted and can be added. As a result, irrigation is essentially free, and the field produces around 50-60 tons of quality grass hay per year. Not only is the scenic canyon sheltered from prevailing winds, but the abundant water and vegetation attract and sustain a wide variety of wildlife; elk, mule deer, white-tailed deer, antelope, and occasional moose, are the major ungulates. Hungarian partridges, chukars, doves, wild turkeys, blue herons, and over 50 migratory bird species are common. The cliffs provide habitat for golden eagles, falcons, hawks and other raptors. The cliffs echo at night with the calls of great horned owls. Predators also visit the ranch: mountain lions, wolves, coyotes, bobcats are common occurrences, and once a while a black bear wanders through eating the currants and gooseberries that grow along the creeks. It is also the water that attracted ancient Native Americans to the ranch. Archaeological sites--the earliest dating to around 13,000 years ago--can be found across the ranch landscape and include prehistoric and historic campsites, stone circles, and numerous petroglyphs, or “rock art.” For nearly six thousand years the ancestors of the Shoshoni made Red Canyon—or in their tongue, Engahonabita Ogwebi, which translates, “Red Canyon it’s creek”--their home. The Shoshoni believe that if you are still and observant while walking in Red Canyon, you can catch glimpses of the mischievous “little people,” the Nynymbi, or magical “water ogres,” called, Pandzoavitz, or, perhaps if you are really lucky, the illusive Water Ghost Woman will appear to you. Here at Red Canyon Ranch, the echoes of the spirits and the hearts of a people remain. In 1897, the first immigrants from Europe came to Red Canyon. Jacob and Amanda Nostrum were from Sweden, and they operated a stage lion on the Fort Washaki to Thermopolis road. The current access into the ranch follows the historic Nostrum Springs stagecoach trail, winding down into the tree-filled canyon to the century-old ruins of the stage station. In 2013, Archaeologist Katherine Burnett finished her Ph.D. dissertation about the Nostrum Springs State Station on Red Canyon Ranch. She wrote in chapter 10: “Lying just under the surface is the bracing story of the staging business in the West, the epic narrative of an ancient travel corridor, the romance of a failed romance etched into the sandstone of Red Canyon itself. One only needs to look, to hear the sounds behind the sounds, to get a sense of the journey at Red Canyon…“The most important lesson in in my research on the Nostrum Strings State Station, however, is this: leave your assumptions at the door, all ye who enter here. File away your mythic ideas about Indian attacks and road agents and dramatic chases. File away your idea that just because a ranch was 20 miles from town that the people who lived there were isolated. File away your idea that stagecoaches and stagecoach lines ran in a vacuum. Red Canyon’s story involves railroads and cars, it might even be seen as a microcosm of the changing American West and the role transportation played in it. File away your idea that just because the Nostrums were a family of Swedish immigrants, that they were just scraping by from the red earth of their homestead on the border with the Wind River Reservation. File away your idea that a woman with 10 children and a dead husband could not make it in this area that no longer thought of itself as the frontier. The Nostrums have the following to say: ‘You may think of us as part of the old West just because we live in the West and you found old things. We consider ourselves distinctly different from the ‘old timers.’ We are part of the great progressive state that is Wyoming. We have connections from Riverton to Yellowstone and beyond. We can travel to Washington, Illinois and Arizona, and we do not do it in a covered wagon. We are the story of the west, of transportation and migration and the settlement of the Indian land. We are a part of the story of the Bighorn and Wind River Basins. We are part of the history of tourism in the West, and are a part of the story of the frontier and a borderland that still sticks with us today. We are a family of Swedes who made it to the frontier and yet didn’t lose our memories of the homeland.’ This is the story of the Nostrums of Red Canyon Ranch, of stage stations, and of the unexpected backstories of the American West.” It is, indeed. It is that backstory that led nationally award-winning archaeologists and New York Times bestselling authors, W. Michael Gear and Kathleen O’Neal Gear, to purchase Red Canyon Ranch in 1992. The Gears restored and remodeled the original Nostrum ranch house, dating to 1916, and lived there for eight years. They currently use it as a guesthouse. About 2,100 square feet, the guesthouse has three bedrooms, one full bath and another ½ bath. The main house, known as the Echo House, because of the canyon echoes where the house is sited against the stunning red cliffs, is a custom designed 4,600 square foot log-post-and-beam home with four bedrooms, two offices, one full bath and two ¾ baths. It is designed as a passive solar home with many Saltillo tile floors to store the daily heat that comes in through the large windows. The five wood stove hearths are expertly tiled in colorful Mexican and Talaveras tiles. The ceiling in the formal dining room is done in a style called “viga and latilla,” meaning it’s composed of large logs cross-laid with a herringbone pattern of smaller pine poles. The style dates to around 3,000 years ago, but was especially used by the ancient Anasazi in the American southwest 1,000 years ago. The upstairs office has a 16-foot ceiling with a beautiful log-truss and windows that look out over the meadow and canyon cliffs beyond. RANCH DETAILS: 1. Red Canyon Ranch consists of 1,619 acres and has two houses, a main house and a guesthouse. The ranch sits 11 miles outside of the charming town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. The new Thermopolis airport is only 15 miles from the ranch. Thermopolis has one of the top five dinosaur museums in the country, as well as Hot Springs State Park, which boasts the largest mineral hot springs in America, and a bison herd. 2. The 2,100 sq. ft., historic guesthouse dates to 1916 and was restored and remodeled in 1993. It has three bedrooms, one full bath, and one half bath, two tiled woodstove hearths, and a covered porch and stone patio for enjoying the vista of the tree-filled creek bottom, which runs beside the guesthouse. 3. The 4,600 sq. ft., log post-and-beam, Echo House, is sited against soaring red cliffs. It was built in 2000, has four bedrooms, two offices, five tiled woodstove hearths, and too many custom features to enumerate, including hand-textured walls, a log staircase, unique ceiling features, as well as two porches and approximately 700 sq. ft. of outdoor decks for viewing the wildlife that call the water-filled, canyon bottom home. 4. Currently the ranch is used for bison ranching—national trophy-winning bison. Why bison? As of this writing bison calves sell for an average of $3.50 per pound, live weight. In comparison, beef calves sell for about $1.50 per pound. In addition, the bison market is consumer driven, unlike beef, which is manipulated by the large packers. Though Red Canyon Ranch operates solely as a breeding stock operation now, selling live animals, for some time it operated a local meat business independent of the national market with more demand than the owners could supply. The bison meat market is currently about 30% underserved. As a result, bison meat averages around $5.50 per lb., while beef averages around $2.00 per lb. (based on the carcass weight). The ranch is completely fenced with a combination of barbed wire and high-tensile electric wire. During the winter, the bison water at the creeks and springs in the canyon bottom, but in the summer, water is piped from an 800 feet deep well to eleven water tanks spread out across the higher elevation pastures. In total the ranch has 12 fenced pastures. There are two corral systems, one upper and one lower. Top-quality bison handling equipment (Berlinic) fills the lower corral system. 5. Red Canyon Ranch is the ultimate in privacy. The next closest house sits seven miles away. It’s a completely sustainable refuge filled with the beauty and solitude of the natural world, but with satellite internet access and a new airport only 15 miles up the road. 
$14,300,000  •  1,508 acres
Gallagher Headquarters Ranch, a world unto itself, spans 1,508 acres of lush Hill Country mountains, clear ambling San Geronimo Creek with its deep lakes and limestone bed shoals, ancient signature Live Oaks, and one of the most historic and well restored headquarters in Texas.
$2,860,000  •  1,215.66 acres
UPDATE!! Now listed below appraisal value!Overview: Tally Bottom Ranch is a wild and beautiful 1,215+/- acre recreational ranch nestled in southern Harrison County. The ranch is primarily made up of sprawling hardwood river bottom habitat that is prime for wildlife and recreation with over a half mile of Sabine River frontage. The ranch boasts an incredible road system with over 12 miles of all-weather access to all corners of the property providing plenty of opportunities for ATV's or horseback riding. One of the unique aspects of the ranch is its proximity to I20 (3.5 miles) and its remote privacy. It is a true get away that will provide you and your family with years of memories. Location: Tally Bottom Ranch is located approximately 6 miles south of Hallsville, Texas, with road frontage on FM 2625 for all weather access. The ranch is also conveniently located only 12 miles from Longview, 16 miles from Marshall, 50 miles from Shreveport, and 138 miles east of downtown Dallas. Improvements: There is a beautiful, custom-built 2-bedroom, 2-bath, 2,759+/- SF home located in the north portion of the property complete with large front and rear porches, all shaded by towering hardwoods. The home, having pier and beam construction, was built in 1996 and has been well-maintained ever since. The main exterior is comprised of fire-retardant Hardiplank and a new roof was installed in 2006. The home boasts two large bedrooms and an office that can be converted into a third bedroom. It also has two A/C units with heat pumps, a gas fireplace in the family room, an antique heating stove in the dining room and views of both the front and back yard from nearly every room. The kitchen is outfitted with Silestone counter tops, an island bar, and custom cabinets. The master bed and bath are both spacious and well-appointed with a beautiful garden tub in the master bath. The immediate yard is surrounded by an iron fence and is completely irrigated from the well water. The home also has a GENERAC Quiet Source Series 45KW back-up generator for convenience. Adjacent to the main home are five other outbuildings including a shop and a horse stable. The main shop is a 30'x50' metal building on a slab with both electricity and water. The tractor and hay shed is 44'x30' with electricity, the horse barn is a metal structure with both electricity and water, 24'x53' in size. Two other storage/office buildings can also be found near the main house, 10'x12' and 8'x16' in size, both with electricity. The river camp is a 1,050 SF building with pier and beam construction, comprised of 1 large bedroom, 1 bathroom, living area, full kitchen, and storage room. The main living area has a full-service kitchen, a wood stove and is cooled by three window units. The bedroom can comfortably sleep 4-6 people making it ideal for a hunting and fishing camp. The camp house was constructed in 2012 with fire-retardant Hardiplank, a metal roof, and an elevated concrete deck and porch. Near the river camp is a water well to supply the entire camp, a screened in cleaning shed, and a skinning rack. All buildings at the river camp are outfitted with both electricity and water. Despite most of the property being within the bottomlands of the Sabine River, the main house and river house have never flooded since they've been built. The house and river camp were both constructed and strategically located in areas that are not conducive to flooding. Well-appointed amenities in close proximity to the Sabine River are a rare find. Ranch History: The Tally Bottom Ranch is part of a larger tract once owned by Longview Industrialist R. G. LeTourneau. Mr. LeTourneau purchased the land in 1948 and for a period over 20 years used the property along the Sabine River to test heavy-duty earthmoving equipment. The property was later used by LeTourneau to experiment with planting and growing hybrid grasses and sorghum crops, as well as raising Charolais cattle. As one can see in an aerial photo of the property, much of the land used for developing the LeTourneau heavy earth moving equipment has resulted in the formation of an unusual slightly rolling landscape.This unique topographic feature was caused by experimenting with a large crusher having 6-foot diameter discs and 10-feet in diameter drums that would knock down large 4-foot diameter trees and shattering the roots of the trees to produce ground mulch. All of this experimentation was the result of large-scale research and development effort by LeTourneau to develop new equipment for large-scale timber projects in West Africa and South America.Today, the remnants of this operation have produced a diverse land use of hay fields, timber stands and some very unique habitat for wildlife. These land striations, per se, have resulted in a higher percentage of "edge" for wildlife, particularly deer. Also, it has potentially added areas that are conducive for waterfowl habitat.Trees, grass, forbs: The ranch consists primarily of hardwood bottom flats with a multitude of clearings uniquely created in a way that supports a large amount of wildlife. The ranch also boasts an incredible amount of pine timber, both planted and native providing the new owner with instant income potential. On the south portion of the ranch you'll also find approximately 100 acres of prime coastal Bermuda with excellent road access for ingress and egress. The deep, fertile river bottom soil produces excellent Bermuda, even in the driest of conditions when grasses located in higher elevations are drying up. This vegetation pattern is unique to this portion of Harrison County and over the years has shown to be a positive when it comes to hunting and recreation. In some of the areas, sloughs have formed and have been reforested providing some really amazing waterfowl habitat. White Oaks, Pin Oaks, Red Oaks, hickory, walnut, river birch, sweet gum, black gum and other hardwoods dominate the property. Numerous soft mass species such as persimmon, willow and pine can also be found throughout the ranch creating a diverse and aesthetically pleasing landscape enjoyed by wildlife and humans alike. Palmettos and native browse cover the forest floor helping create the unique environment only found in a true hardwood river bottom.Water: There is an abundance of water across the ranch ranging from low lying wetland sloughs to ponds and lakes and of course access to the Sabine River. There are dozens of acres of prime waterfowl habitat including flooded green timber, and other seasonal wetlands. Shallow water wells supply drinking water to the main house and river house while a well for irrigation/lake supplementation can be found at the 4-acre pond. Topography: The terrain is fairly flat, as is with most river bottoms in East Texas. The river house and main house are both perched on the higher points while the lower areas can be easily noticed on the aerial map. The hay meadows are also somewhat flat but drain well providing access throughout much of the year. The topography through the timber varies with some areas draining better than others. With that being said, there are some incredible opportunities to enhance and develop sound waterfowl habitat. Such diversity offers the landowner countless options for recreational opportunities. Wildlife and fisheries: The Sabine River bottoms are historically known for producing excellent whitetail deer. White tailed deer, hogs, squirrels, waterfowl and other varmints can all be found across the ranch. A high level of care has been given by the owner and the hunters to ensure that only mature bucks and the proper number of does are to be harvested each year. As a result, last year, one hunter harvested a buck scoring 168 1/8" B&C. Whether you prefer to run lines or fish with rod and reel, this ranch has you covered. The 4+ acre pond on the south end of the ranch provides excellent fishing opportunities. While the 1/2 mile of river frontage offers opportunities to fish from the bank. There is also an established boat ramp near the camp house for convenience if you wish to launch a boat onto the river. Fish species include flathead and blue catfish, sand bass, crappie and gar. Livestock/hay production: This ranch offers approximately 100 acres of highly improved pastures, which historically, has been fertilized and managed for optimum production. These coastal pastures are currently yielding clean, high quality hay suitable for both cattle and horses. There is currently no livestock grazing the ranch, but fences have been built with quality in mind and will certainly be effective for turning cattle. Minerals: No oil/gas minerals conveyed, only surface minerals. Easements: There are several easements granted to neighboring landowners, pipeline companies and two O & G companies servicing and developing natural gas wells on the property.Utilities: Electricity is provided by Upshur Rural Electric. Water wells provide water to the main house and the river camp. An additional well is in place near the 4-acre pond for supplemental use. Gas provided by Martin LP.Property Taxes: The majority ofTally Bottom Ranchcurrently carries an Agriculture/Timber Exemptions. Ask Broker for details.Schools: Hallsville ISDPrice:$2,860,000 ($2,352.63/acre)Contact: Stephen Schwartz- Agent, 903-738-78821,201+/- acres without house and surrounding 14+/- acres is available for $2,400,000 ($1,998.26/acre). Ask broker for map and details.
$2,400,000  •  1,201.04 acres
UPDATE!! Now listed below appraisal value!Overview: Tally Bottom Ranch is a wild and beautiful 1,201+/- acre recreational ranch nestled in southern Harrison County. The ranch is primarily made up of sprawling hardwood river bottom habitat that is prime for wildlife and recreation with over a half mile of Sabine River frontage. The ranch boasts an incredible road system with over 12 miles of all-weather access to all corners of the property providing plenty of opportunities for ATV's or horseback riding. One of the unique aspects of the ranch is its proximity to I20 (3.5 miles) and its remote privacy. It is a true get away that will provide you and your family with years of memories.Location: Tally Bottom Ranch is located approximately 6 miles south of Hallsville, Texas, with road frontage on FM 2625 for all weather access. The ranch is also conveniently located only 12 miles from Longview, 16 miles from Marshall, 50 miles from Shreveport, and 138 miles east of downtown Dallas. Improvements: The river camp is located on the southern portion of the ranch and boasts a 1,050 SF building with pier and beam construction, comprised of 1 large bedroom, 1 bathroom, living area, full kitchen, and storage room. The main living area has a full-service kitchen, a wood stove and is cooled by three window units. The bedroom can comfortably sleep 4-6 people making it ideal for a hunting and fishing camp. The camp house was constructed in 2012 with fire-retardant Hardiplank, a metal roof, and an elevated concrete deck and porch. Near the river camp is a water well to supply the entire camp, a screened in cleaning shed, and a skinning rack. All buildings at the river camp are outfitted with both electricity and water. Despite most of the property being within the bottomlands of the Sabine River, the river house has never flooded since they've been built. The river camp was constructed and strategically located in an area that is not conducive to flooding. Well-appointed amenities in close proximity to the Sabine River are a rare find.Ranch History: The Tally Bottom Ranch is part of a larger tract once owned by Longview Industrialist R. G. LeTourneau. Mr. LeTourneau purchased the land in 1948 and for a period over 20 years used the property along the Sabine River to test heavy-duty earthmoving equipment. The property was later used by LeTourneau to experiment with planting and growing hybrid grasses and sorghum crops, as well as raising Charolais cattle. As one can see in an aerial photo of the property, much of the land used for developing the LeTourneau heavy earth moving equipment has resulted in the formation of an unusual slightly rolling landscape.This unique topographic feature was caused by experimenting with a large crusher having 6-foot diameter discs and 10-feet in diameter drums that would knock down large 4-foot diameter trees and shattering the roots of the trees to produce ground mulch. All of this experimentation was the result of large-scale research and development effort by LeTourneau to develop new equipment for large-scale timber projects in West Africa and South America.Today, the remnants of this operation have produced a diverse land use of hay fields, timber stands and some very unique habitat for wildlife. These land striations, per se, have resulted in a higher percentage of "edge" for wildlife, particularly deer. Also, it has potentially added areas that are conducive for waterfowl habitat.Trees, grass, forbs: The ranch consists primarily of hardwood bottom flats with a multitude of clearings uniquely created in a way that supports a large amount of wildlife. The ranch also boasts an incredible amount of pine timber, both planted and native providing the new owner with instant income potential. On the south portion of the ranch you'll also find approximately 100 acres of prime coastal Bermuda with excellent road access for ingress and egress. The deep, fertile river bottom soil produces excellent Bermuda, even in the driest of conditions when grasses located in higher elevations are drying up. This vegetation pattern is unique to this portion of Harrison County and over the years has shown to be a positive when it comes to hunting and recreation. In some of the areas, sloughs have formed and have been reforested providing some really amazing waterfowl habitat. White Oaks, Pin Oaks, Red Oaks, hickory, walnut, river birch, sweet gum, black gum and other hardwoods dominate the property. Numerous soft mass species such as persimmon, willow and pine can also be found throughout the ranch creating a diverse and aesthetically pleasing landscape enjoyed by wildlife and humans alike. Palmettos and native browse cover the forest floor helping create the unique environment only found in a true hardwood river bottom.Water: There is an abundance of water across the ranch ranging from low lying wetland sloughs to ponds and lakes and of course access to the Sabine River. There are dozens of acres of prime waterfowl habitat including flooded green timber, and other seasonal wetlands. A shallow water well supplies drinking water to the river house while a additional well for irrigation/lake supplementation can be found at the 4-acre pond. Topography: The terrain is fairly flat, as is with most river bottoms in East Texas. The river house is perched on a higher point while the lower areas can be easily noticed on the aerial map. The hay meadows are also somewhat flat but drain well providing access throughout much of the year. The topography through the timber varies with some areas draining better than others. With that being said, there are some incredible opportunities to enhance and develop sound waterfowl habitat. Such diversity offers the landowner countless options for recreational opportunities. Wildlife and fisheries: The Sabine River bottoms are historically known for producing excellent whitetail deer. White tailed deer, hogs, squirrels, waterfowl and other varmints can all be found across the ranch. A high level of care has been given by the owner and the hunters to ensure that only mature bucks and the proper number of does are to be harvested each year. As a result, last year, one hunter harvested a buck scoring 168 1/8" B&C. Whether you prefer to run lines or fish with rod and reel, this ranch has you covered. The 4+ acre pond on the south end of the ranch provides excellent fishing opportunities. While the 1/2 mile of river frontage offers opportunities to fish from the bank. There is also an established boat ramp near the camp house for convenience if you wish to launch a boat onto the river. Fish species include flathead and blue catfish, sand bass, crappie and gar. Livestock/hay production: This ranch offers approximately 100 acres of highly improved pastures, which historically, has been fertilized and managed for optimum production. These coastal pastures are currently yielding clean, high quality hay suitable for both cattle and horses. There is currently no livestock grazing the ranch, but fences have been built with quality in mind and will certainly be effective for turning cattle. Minerals: No oil/gas minerals conveyed, only surface minerals. Easements: There are several easements granted to neighboring landowners, pipeline companies and two O & G companies servicing and developing natural gas wells on the property.Utilities: Electricity is provided by Upshur Rural Electric. A water well provides water to the river camp. An additional well is in place near the 4-acre pond for supplemental use. Property Taxes: The Tally Bottom Ranchcurrently carries an Agriculture/Timber Exemptions. Ask Broker for details.Schools: Hallsville ISDPrice:  $2,400,000 ($1,998.26/acre)Contact: Stephen Schwartz- Agent, 903-738-7882 mobile14+/- acres with a custom-built home, barns, and shop are available on the north end of the ranch for an additional $450,000. Ask broker for map and details.
Reduced
$2,218,440  •  1,112 acres
$2,418,600
The southern pasture of the Valdina Ranch is part of the historic Valdina Farms. It is located in the transitional region of Medina County where the Hill Country meets the South Texas Plains.
$9,500,000  •  998.7 acres
Chicora Wood PlantationGrace Restored ~ Chicora Wood is a 1,000± acre historic rice plantation on the Pee Dee River in Georgetown, South Carolina’s Lowcountry.  The restored house and surrounding buildings are some of the finest preserved examples of historic rice plantation architecture and grounds in the state.  The 10,000± square foot, fully restored plantation house dates to the 1700’s, was remodeled and enlarged by the Allston family in 1838 and features ten bedrooms and eight-and-a-half baths and is situated overlooking the river, gardens, and is surrounded by majestic live oaks.  The plantation has tremendous and untapped recreational opportunities.  Water resources include nearly one mile of both sides of the Pee Dee, over two miles of Chapel Creek, and a two acre lake.  Of his seven plantations amounting to 13,500± acres, Chicora Wood was the chosen home place of Governor Allston in the 1800s.  Chicora Wood has an exclusive Plantersville Road address, shared with about a dozen other notable plantations such as Exchange, Rosebank, Arundel, Hasty Point, and Weymouth.  Like Chicora Wood, many of the nearby plantations have also placed conservation easements on their land, ensuring the integrity, grace, and charm of the neighborhood is preserved for generations to come.The Facts:1000± acre idyllic riverfront plantation located near Georgetown, South CarolinaNearly a mile of frontage on both sides of the Pee Dee RiverLocated on Plantersville Road, one of the premier plantation neighborhoods in the south, nearby to Rosebank, Exchange, Hasty Point, Weymouth and othersMeticulously restored 10,000± square foot 1838 plantation house featuring 10 bedrooms and 8.5 baths overlooking the river and surrounded by ancient live oaksSome of the best preserved plantation grounds and historic dependencies in the Lowcountry:   Rice mill and chimney, rice shipping barn, summer kitchen, brick smokehouse, schoolhouse, carriage house/barn, driver’s house, and gatekeeper’s lodgeFormal gardens designed in the 1930’s by Loutrel Briggs, landscape architect responsible for developing Charleston’s distinctive garden styleOther improvements include a carpentry shop, barn/boat shed, dock and boat ramp, tennis court, great road system, private bridge over Chapel Creek, plantation office, and additional equipment barnsApx 80 acres of old rice impoundments with well-maintained leveesOver two miles of frontage on both sides of Chapel CreekTwo-acre lakePrivate and serene with house set ¼ mile off Plantersville RoadJust a 20± minute boat ride to the historic seaport of GeorgetownThe river provides access to great fishing and recreational opportunities Very interesting template for developing duck, dove, and quail hunting opportunitiesIncredible turkey populations and lots of deerOne of seven plantations in a row protected by a conservation easementWell-documented provenance commencing with King George II’s land grant in 1730sOne of the most successful rice plantations of its timeChicora Wood served as the family seat for generations of the prominent Allston familyOf his seven plantations and 13,500 acres, Chicora was the most favored property of South Carolina Governor Robert F. W. AllstonThe property has only been sold (outside of family) three times since the King’s Grant of the 1730’s