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$6,052,267  •  13,468 acres
$8,341,656
Location Coyanosa Draw Ranch formally known as the Alpine High Ranch is part of the historic Townsend Ranch. The Hudgins family was granted this property as payment for building a fence around the huge historic Townsend ownership. The ranch fronts on Highway 67 between Fort Stockton and Alpine, with the entrance just 18 miles south of I-10 and 26 miles from Fort Stockton and its regional amenities. The ranch has a major drainage, Coyanosa Draw, that crosses the property and is adjacent to some of the largest ranches in the Trans Pecos, including the Elsinore and Leoncita Ranches. Center Pivot Irrigation is operating adjacent to the south with 1,000 gal/min wells confirming the amazing groundwater resources. Acreage 12,177.60 Acres Owned and 1,290.83 Acres Leased in Pecos County, Texas. Description Coyanosa Draw Ranch lies over a freshwater aquifer and represents a diverse landscape of deep bottom soils along the broad gravelly flats, limestone hills with commanding views of many of the area mountain ranges, including the Del Norte, Glass and The Davis Mountains. This cow country hunting ranch is very accessible, yet you can hide away in the many interesting secret draws and cover where you will find abundant populations of desert Mule Deer, Elk, dove, and the wily Blue Quail. The ranch has a tremendous road infrastructure and, with just a corner of the ranch located along Highway 67, it is very private but extremely accessible. The topography of the ranch is a broad open valley with several limestone hills, cut by broad wooded draws and elevations ranging from 3,500 feet to 3,100 feet, which makes for a wide variety of soils and a very interesting mix of habitats. The ranch to the south has several center pivot irrigation fields right up to the fence-line, accessing the same aquifer under this ranch, the Hovey Channel. There are several areas where this could be replicated along Coyanosa Draw as there is a huge amount of relatively shallow fresh water, with deep soils. The ranch has a number of windmills and solar wells. Electricity is located at the southwest corner and an excellent submersible water pump produces from only 220 feet. There are several dirt tanks on the ranch with room for many more. Monsoon rains come in the summers, providing for an excellent growing season of a wide variety of Chihuahuan Desert plants, shrubs, and grasses. There is an extensive road network on the ranch and the exterior fences range from new to functional. Several caliche gravel pits will provide significant materials for future needs. The owners have built extensive all-weather caliche roads. There is a great metal barn, as well as a set of pens and a historic rock ruin, and many places to build a new lodge or headquarters. Habitat The landscape consists of one-half foothills to the Glass Mountains and the other half deep-soil bottom land. This ranch lies at an elevation that supports a mix of vegetation from the mid-Chihuahuan Desert such as century plants, Spanish dagger, yucca, agarita, sotol and cholla, with a dominant gramma grass mix and scattered bush/trees, including creosote, mesquite, hackberry, and soap berry. Native grasslands provide excellent forage for livestock as well as habitat for Mule Deer and native birds and mammals. The ranch also has several ridges and hills rich in a diversity of rocks and minerals, including many types of agates. Wildlife This is Chihuahuan Desert grassland and scrubland at its very best. The grasses, forbs and brush provide excellent habitat for game and non-game animals and birds. Mule Deer and Elk are the primary game animals. Coyotes, javelina, bobcats, and badgers are all also present. Blue (Scaled) Quail and Doves are the game birds. Raptors include Golden Eagles and wide variety of hawks, neotropical migratory birds, such as orioles, hummingbirds, warblers, flycatchers, and many others make for a wonderful birding experience. Water The ranch lies over a tremendous freshwater aquifer, both shallow and deep. There are three windmills, one solar pump, two generator pumps, and one electric submersible. Water is distributed to several storage tanks and water troughs for wildlife and livestock. Development of irrigated alfalfa and other wildlife forage could greatly enhance the Deer and Elk populations. The water and soils are there, and with gas wells on the ranch, natural gas pumps could provide the energy needed to develop the irrigated cropland component. Minerals This ranch is located within the newly discovered Alpine High geologic region of West Texas. There are active well sites within eyesight of the ranch today both west and south which used horizontal technology in nontraditional shale zones. Seller has access to 3D Seismic that covers the entire ranch and can be made available with the purchase. The older traditional wells on the ranch have been and are being cleaned up and plugged, leaving clean and orderly remaining production facilities. There is one shut-in well on Section 34 with a two-year lease term and a 1/4th royalty. The remainder of the ranch is unleased. There is also a surface use agreement over the ranch, covering gas and water line rights-of-way and saltwater disposal operations. The Seller owns 25% of the Fee Minerals which includes executive rights and will convey all that they own or approximately 2,269.88 Net Mineral Acres. Additionally, there are also 3,098.10 acres of Mineral Classified state minerals on the ranch. Rarely do you get a chance to own minerals in an area where a single future lease could be an economic game changer. Activity and Current Condition of Oil and Gas Minerals 1) Ranch contains 9,079.5 gross mineral acres total, and Seller (Blackbeard Resources, LLC) has 25% of minerals. Buyer will receive Seller’s mineral interest, which equates to 25% of total, or approximately 2,269.88 net mineral acres. All minerals are currently unleased except for 704 acres around a shut-in gas well. a) The ranch is located in the prolific Delaware Basin and offsets Apache’s Alpine High Play b) The stratum consists of a 6,000’ hydrocarbon column with 3rd Bone Spring, Wolfcamp, Penn., Barnett, and Woodford formations with stacked oil, wet gas, and dry gas potential c) Offset development has drastically increased since Apache announced the play in September 2016 with drilling activity within 5 miles of the ranch’s borders 2) An additional 3,098 net acres are classified as “Mineral Classified” by State of Texas a) Most recent oil and gas lease on mineral classified land was in 2011 on about 3,058 acres for $500/ac, 3-year term and 25% royalty. That lease is now expired, and lands are available for a new lease. b) Mineral classified lands have minerals owned by the State of Texas. Surface owner of the land acts as agent for the State and equally shares the lease bonus and royalty with the State. Buyer will receive all the benefits due to surface owner on mineral classified lands. 3) Historical gas production from wells on Alpine High Ranch minerals is about 8,300,000 MCF, (where 1 MCF = 1,000 cu ft of gas). Productive wells on adjacent lands to the south add another 9,500,000 MCF. The vast majority of gas production is from the Devonian reservoir at depth of about 13,000 ft. 4) The previous owner Abraxas acquired a proprietary 3D seismic survey covering about 39 square miles in 2001. Seller of the ranch will grant a license to this seismic data to a new Purchaser. Abraxas utilized the 3D seismic data to successfully drill horizontal wells on closed structures. Some structures remain untested.
$37,500,000  •  8,480 acres
This very productive, irrigated and dryland farm offers you 11,680 total acres (8,480 deeded with optional 3,200 leased). Located in western Nebraska, this is an area with highly sought-after farmland and may be one of the best, well-run farming practices on the market today. It offers abundant soft water (livestock-quality), excellent soils, good access to markets, 3-phase power, and well-maintained improvements. Seize this rare opportunity to obtain some of the nation’s most productive farmland, with 393,100 bushels of grain storage, 3 homes, multiple outbuildings, and much more.
$16,800,000  •  5,498 acres
Consisting of 35 Highly productive quarters spread over 23 miles. There are 5498 acres of deep fertile soils that provide the foundation for excellent level dryland crops. The entire operation is managed from an impressive headquarters in western Nebraska.
$6,704,800  •  4,624 acres
The ± 4,624-acre Jacalon Ranch, located about 20 minutes from Hebbronville on the southeastern corner of Webb and northeastern corner of Zapata counties, is the South Texas ranch that wildlife enthusiasts dream of. The low-fenced ranch, surrounded by sprawling historic ranches, is home to exceptional whitetail and quail (both bobs and blues) hunting. Dove and waterfowl are abundant in their seasons. Thriving wildlife populations are a combination of exceptional habitat and effective, conscientious game management. The Jacalon Ranch, that traces its beginnings to the Jose Vasquez Borrego Spanish land grant issued in the 1760s, benefits from both. The trophy whitetail herd is managed under a MLD Level III Permit. For the past six seasons, limited hunting pressure has been applied. The diverse soil (Brundage Fine Sandy Loam, Copita Fine Sandy Loam, Hebbronville Loamy Fine Sand, Maverick-Catarina Complex, Zapata-Outcrop Complex and Gently Undulating) produces diverse vegetation delivering a natural buffet of high-energy, high-protein browse and forbs that grow robust animals. It is a rare ranch that encompasses so much diverse soil, topography and habitat. The Jacalon Ranch is in an ecological transition zone marked by the Bordas Escarpment that runs through the upper portion of the ranch. It brings together the famous red sandy country, brush motts and savannah grasslands of the Coastal Plains with the rolling hills and flatlands typical of this region of South Texas. Thanks to the escarpment the ranch also offers stunning views. On clear days, you can see Mexico’s Sierra Madre Mountains—and they’re 125 miles away. Even the strongest habitat can’t support wildlife without water. Fortunately, the Jacalon Ranch delivers with four wells, 7 stock tanks, and several creeks distributed throughout. A windmill, located near the ranch entrance, pulls from a well at 200 feet. Two more newly drilled wells that hit water at 400 feet are in the same general area and offer 4,500 gallons of storage. These wells, which flow at approximately 10 – 15 gpm each, have excellent quality drinking water. The fourth well, near the center of the ranch, extends 1,050 feet deep and provides water for wildlife, livestock and filling tanks at a rate of ± 40 gpm. FM 649 provides road frontage access to the ranch and its centerpiece, the Jacalon Ranch Lodge beautifully appointed with Spanish and Southwestern furniture and décor befitting its history and location. The lodge boasts 11 suites each with a private bath. The suites join the soaring two-story main building; the complex is equipped with telephone, high-speed internet and dish satellite. Designed to easily handle a crowd, the lodge includes a modern kitchen, a large dining room and bar area, a utility room and a full bath in the common area. Guests can enjoy a fire pit and an outdoor seating area in the midst of a native landscape oasis. A rain catchment system with an 8,000 gallon capacity helps meet water needs. To make coming and going even easier, the Jacalon Ranch Runway, a private/restricted 3,900 foot turf runway (TE89), is located adjacent to the lodge. Jim Hogg County Airport, with a paved and lighted 5,000 foot runaway, is 20 minutes away and the Laredo International Airport, which handles private and commercial flights, is 40 minutes away. The Jacalon Ranch is the stuff of a wildlife enthusiasts’ dreams—but it’s real. To experience the Jacalon Ranch for yourself, contact Howard W. Hood at 830-739-3815. Available for $1,450/acre.
$3,058,000  •  3,611 acres
Sawmill Creek Ranch +/- 3022 Deeded AcresBordering the Gila National Forest, the +/- 3022 deeded acres plus 589 leased acres of the Dripping Springs Allotment of the Saw Mill Creek Ranch in Grant County, New Mexico may just be the land investment you've been looking for. With a year-round live creek and 3 solar wells, this well- timbered parcel of the Y6 Ranch has never been on the market in its history. The well-watered canyons and mesas have maintained cattle for generations and is in a great position to become the game producing mecca you've longed for. A ranch with grazing income! Low Taxes! Incredible water and game! A county-maintained road accesses this secluded parcel consisting of end-to-end live creek framed by cottonwoods and massive oaks and dripping springs feeding rocky pools that run year round. Native grass meadows, alligator bark junipers, pinions, ponderosa pines and more. And did I mention massive oaks!!! The ranch carries unlimited landowner elk and mule deer tags, with Coues Whitetail, javelina, turkey and bear along with quail, lion, bobcat and coyote as a bonus. Located against the Arizona border, BGU 23, the regulations allow for unlimited landowner deer and elk tags (check regulations). The Gila is noted for producing some World Class trophy size elk, large mule deer and some very nice Coues Whitetails. This parcel has been the underutilized parcel of a much larger ranch that has been in the same family for generations. Should the buyer be interested in maintaining the very low tax ag status, the family would be interested in continuing a leased grazing and care-taking arrangement. Dripping Springs Allotment is an additional +/-589 acres Gila National Forest Grazing Lease adjacent to the deeded acreage that allows for 24 cattle pair to be grazed 6 months a year, for just a few dollars a year. The property is currently undergoing surveying and fencing. Actual acreage may vary. Sawmill Creek Ranch, while being secluded, has 3 good wells and is accessed via county maintained road. The Sawmill Creek Ranch has gorgeous canyons, creek bottom, large meadows and a couple dirt tanks but is wide open for some additional game management. Bull elk rubs abound up and down the canyon. No improvements currently exist so your investment is totally in the land. The ranch is off-grid and within a half mile of power, but it would be best served by solar. The locations for your hidden cabin or home are too many to count. Incredible weather, scenic 360-degree views, untouched flora and fauna, teeming with wildlife, what more could you ask for? Close proximity to Tucson, Phoenix and California make this a great getaway.Virgin holdings such as the Sawmill Creek Ranch /Drippings Springs Grazing Allotment are almost non-existent today. Call or email Greg Liddle for additional information and a qualified showing. Co Brokers Welcome! Note: In order to confirm a showing, financial verification is required. Thank you.
Reduced
$5,073,285  •  2,543 acres
$5,849,447
The Valdina Ranch is the house pasture of the historic Valdina Farms, located in the sought after transition country, where the hill country meets south Texas. Valdina Farms was an 18,000-acre ranch established in the early 1900’s by Mr. E.F. Woodward.
$8,950,000  •  1,937 acres
- 1,937 deeded acres - Excellent hunting, equestrian, or family ranch - Several springs, ponds, & Tierra Amarilla Creek - Excellent hunting with annual elk & deer tags - Improvement include: owners home, guest house, barn, carriage house, & more - Located between Chama & Santa Fe
$16,000,000  •  1,833 acres
Under Contract
Property Description: 1833.536+/- acres with a HUGE PRIVATE 550+/- ACRE LAKE set amongst scenic rolling terrain heavily wooded in oak and elm forests. Clear right-of-ways, scenic elevation change and excellent building locations. Raw land with limited improvements allows for a blank canvas to with endless possibilities.Area Historical Information: McLennan County is deep seeded in history with the first Spanish exploring expedition in 1721 by Marques de San Miguel de Aguayo. Records show that during his expedition he camped near the Brazos River and a major tributary, Bosque, Spanish for woods.Multiple native Indian tribes lived and roamed the area and was occupied by three main tribes - Caddo, Tonkawa and three branches of the Wichita - Tawakoni, Towash and Waco. The Tonkawas were the most predominant in number and referred to as "Tonks" by the European settlers. They lived in skin tents and followed bison, deer and other small animals. They were considered to be roaming hunter/gatherers which provided for many conflicts by the neighboring Comanche to the west.Further settlement of the area began in 1837 when Fort Fisher, a Texas Ranger outpost, was established but abandoned a few months later. Waco Village was later built on the site of an ancient agricultural village of the Waco Indians. A two-league grant of land by Gen. Thomas J Chambers was the start of development in the area where land was sold for a dollar an acre. The Chisolm Trail later crossed at a shallow ford in the Brazos River where the town of Kimball was formed, west of Waco. In 1845, Neil McLennan moved onto land on the South Bosque River. In 1850, named after Neil McLennan, McLennan County was carved out of the Milam District and the same year Universal Immigration Company of England purchased 27,000 acres from Richard Kimball where 30 families were sent to settle the area. Bosque County was officially formed in February 1854 from McLennan County totaling 989 square miles. European settlers began to populate the area in 1854 when the State of Texas offered 320 acres to each family that would settle the new county, and Norwegians took advantage of the offer believing the area to be much like Norway. In 1856, Waco Village was incorporated as the town of Waco, and a new county courthouse was erected that year. By 1859, there were 749 people living in Waco.Location: Located in eastern McLennan County, Lake Creek Reservoir is on Manos Creek in the Brazos River basin approximately four miles west of Riesel, TX. It is located approximately 12 miles east of Waco, ~100 miles from Dallas/Fort Worth, ~110 miles from Austin & ~165 from Houston, Texas.Directions: From Waco, go East on Highway 6 toward Riesel. Prior to arriving in Riesel turn south on FM 1860 going approximately ~5 miles to the first main gate on the left. Just past this gate the lake can be partially seen on the left. FM 1860 continues around the ranch and ties back into Hwy 6 in Riesel, TX.Lake Creek Reservoir: This is a superior body of water constructed by Austin Road Company in 1953. There were no expenses spared at the time of construction. The water clarity is very good being in limestone based land. The lake is considered a magnificent recreational lake. There are 3 primary drainage basins with Manos Creek being the primary source of run-off water. The lake boasts multiple scenic coves, a magnificent tree covered island in the center of the lake, deep water shorelines and duck habitat in the backwaters of the lake making this an extremely versatile body of water in an area not known to have large lakes. Maximum depth is estimated to be ~35' at the deepest point with fourteen square miles of drainage feeding the lake. Based on aerial imagery from 2005-2015 the average water surface acreage was 442.475+/- acres with an average of 9.7+/- miles of lake frontage. Also based on aerial imagery, it is estimated that the lake fluctuated between ~343 surface acres and ~555 surface acres with only three of the last ten years being less than ~400 acres. Lake Creek is a desirable lake even at lower lake levels with some of the shorelines being gravel based and blossom with native grasses providing for a clean and scenic shoreline. Fluctuation of lake level is not believed to have any impact on the quality of the reservoir.Lake Dam History: A Water Right Permit dated May 10, 1951 was granted by the State Board of Water Engineers to Texas Power and Light for constructing the reservoir. Austin Road Company began construction on September 8, 1951 and the dam was completed May 1952. Impoundment of water began in June 1952 by runoff inflow from approximately 14 square miles. The first generating unit began commercial operation April 2, 1953. The dam is highly engineered and well-constructed with an estimated cost in 1952 of $10.8M. On January 26, 1972 the permitted water capacity was reduced from 9,500 acre-feet to its now current level of 8,500 acre-feet at 405 ft above msl. Lake Creek previously operated as a natural gas fired power plant which has since been completely removed and remediated. It was in operation from 1953 to 2010.Water rights:Impoundment limit - 8,500 acre feetPermitted Consumptive Rights - 10,000 acre feetMaximum Make-Up Water per year from the Brazos River - 8,996 acre feetWater is pumped via through a pipeline from a pump station located on the Brazos River in close proximity to the lake.Dam Report: Freese and Nichols, Inc conducted a dam inspection on July 18, 2017 and provided a report dated November 2017 of the Lake Creek Dam (a full report can be made available to pre-qualified Buyers). The following is the "Project Description":Lake Creek Dam was completed in 1952 to provide a cooling reservoir for the operation of Lake Creek Steam Electric Station. The dam consists of a homogenous, earthen embankment with a length of 1,860 feet and a maximum height of 50 feet above the original streambed. Based on the 2003 inspection report, the dam's crest elevation varies from 409.75 to 410.25 feet-msl. The normal pool of Lake Creek Reservoir is elevation 402 feet-msl. The embankment has side slopes of 2.5 Horizontal to 1 Vertical (2.5H:1V) for both the upstream and downstream slopes. The upstream slope of the embankment is protected by a 1-foot thick layer of rock riprap underlain by a 1-foot thick gravel bedding layer extending from the crest to elevation 395 feet-msl (seven feet below normal pool elevation). A 4-inch thick layer of gravel protects the downstream slope. Lake Creek Dam originally had no internal seepage collection system; however, a toe drain system consisting of a 6-inch perforated PVC pipe placed in a gravel filter and surrounded by filter fabric was installed in 2007 along the downstream toe of the embankment.Discharge from the reservoir are controlled by two 20-foot tall by approximately 32.75-foot wide radial gates at the left (south) abutment. The service spillway transitions into a 40-foot wide concrete chute, stilling basin, and outfall channel. The top elevation of the spillway gates is 405 feet-msl in the closed position, and the crest of the ogee weir at the gates is elevation 385 feet-msl. An uncontrolled earthen emergency spillway with a crest elevation of 406 feet-msl and a width of 523 feet is located in the right (north) abutment of the dam.In Texas, the TCEQ is the regulatory agency responsible for the administration of state dam safety laws. Dams are classified according to the size of the dam and the potential for loss of human life and property damages downstream from the dam in the event of a breach of the dam. The size classification of small, intermediate, or large is based on the storage in the reservoir and the height of the dam. Intermediate size dams are those with a maximum storage between 1,000 and 50,000 acre-feet and/or a height greater than 40 ft and less than 100 ft. With a height of 50 feet and a top of the dam storage of 11,700 acre feet Lake Creek Dam is classified as an intermediate size structure.A dam's hazard classification can be low, significant, or high based on the downstream risks in the event of a failure. The area downstream of the dam consists primarily of undeveloped land in the floodplain of Manos Creek. Farm-to-Market Road 1860 crosses the spillway discharge channel downstream of the dam. The confluence of Manos Creek and the Brazos River is located approximately 0.6 miles downstream of the dam. Based on a visual review there are a few scattered homes located downstream of the dam; however, they appear to be located at an elevation which would likely not be in the inundation zone. Farm-to-Market Road 1860 would be classified as a minor highway; however, since it was observed to be as a school bus route, it would be considered a secondary highway. TCEQ criteria define a significant hazard structure as one where failure can cause appreciable economic loss to isolated homes, secondary highways, minor railroads, and public utilities or which could potentially impact one to six lives or involve two or fewer habitable structures. Lake Creek Dam is currently classified as a significant hazard dam.According to State criteria, an intermediate size, significant hazard structure is required to pass 56 percent of the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) based on the height and storage parameters of Lake Creek Dam. As determined by an August 2013 hydraulic study performed by FNI, Lake Creek Dam passes 87 percent of the PMF event without overtopping the embankment. Therefore, the dam is considered hydraulically adequate.Inspection Summary Report: A full Freese & Nichols, Inc. report, dated November 2017, containing specific details in connection with minor repair recommendations can be made available to prequalified Buyers upon request.Terrain: Terrain is scenic with ~120' of elevation change. Property is mostly treed with sporadic native pastureland desirable for grazing cattle. The landscape lends itself to be considered recreational land. There are highly desirable scenic views/building sites from the southernmost hilltops overlooking Lake Creek Reservoir.Water Wells: There are two known water wells on the property. One water well is believed to be ~685 feet producing approximately 248 gallons per minute (gpm). The second well is believed to be approximately ~700 feet producing approximately 245 gallons per minute (gpm). Neither of the wells are believed to operational currently but there is no reason to believe they could not be put back into use.Other Surface Water: Several small ancillary stock tanks exist as well as one small lake being approximately 3.5+/- surface acres that is partially shared with a neighbor.Wildlife: Wildlife is an untouched and untapped resource. There are whitetail deer, abundant dove, feral hogs, squirrels, bobcats, coyotes, and a variety of songbirds. Migratory waterfowl have been seen in large numbers, have never been hunted and use the lake as a wintering ground during peak migration being located just off the banks of the Brazos River, being a major flyway in the Central Flyway.Fisheries: While Lake Creek has never officially been stocked there seems to be an abundance and wide variety of fish species that have naturally been stocked and reproduced in the lake. The fish that were caught and observed while filming were largemouth bass, catfish and bluegill. The fish habitat and lake appear to be prime for fish management and additional stocking/management.Fencing: The perimeter is fenced and there is no functional cross fencing. Condition of the fencing is fair to good. A 6' chain-link fence was constructed below the dam and has been well maintained and presently in very good condition.Access: There are ten (10) gated access points into the ranch, all are secure and the lake is virtually unused. There are multiple heavy duty pipe entrances into the ranch. Manos Creek can be crossed on the east end of the ranch via a well-constructed concrete three culvert crossing.Airports: There are two airports in close proximity Lake Creek Ranch. Waco Regional Airport (ACT) is a full service airport located 5+/- miles NW of Waco and 22+/- miles from the ranch. It is a Class 1 Airport averaging 98 aircraft per day with two (2) runways measuring 6,596' and 5,896'. Additionally, TSTC Waco Airport (CNW) is located 8+/- miles NE of Waco and 15+/- from the ranch. The airport averages 131 aircraft per day with two (2) runways measuring 8,600' and 6,291'. Former President George W. Bush landed Air Force One at TSTC when visiting their family ranch during his presidency.Hospitals: There are three full service hospitals located in close proximity to the ranch. Hill Regional Hospital, Providence Health Center, Hillcrest Baptist Medical Center all located in and around Waco, Texas.School District: Riesel ISDElectricity: Oncor Electric, and Navasota Valley Co-opMinerals: Minerals are negotiable. Owner is believed to own a majority of the minerals on the ranch, but no warranties or guarantees will be made.Grazing Leases: The ranch is currently leased for grazing and hay production. Fishing and hunting have been prohibited during the current ownership.Taxes: Annual property taxes for 2015 were approximately $17,851.73 and the property is agricultural exemptLegal Description: Estimated ~1833.536+/- acres in which a plat map and legal description of the property resulting from a boundary survey conducted in 2013 can be made available to prequalified Buyers.Buyers & Brokers: Buyer's brokers must be present for all initial showings. Buyers should notify Listing Broker that they are represented prior to touring the property. We welcome the opportunity to work with other Brokers/ Agents, but expect their full participation in any transaction.Comments: Rare opportunity to own a massive private lake in the heart of Central Texas close to Waco, TX and three major metropolitan areas.Contact:Cash McWhorter - Partner/Broker, 469-222-4076 MobileBlake Hortenstine - Partner/Broker, 214-616-1305 Mobile
Reduced
$2,218,440  •  1,112 acres
$2,418,600
The southern pasture of the Valdina Ranch is part of the historic Valdina Farms. It is located in the transitional region of Medina County where the Hill Country meets the South Texas Plains.
Reduced
$8,900,000  •  998.7 acres
$9,500,000
Chicora Wood PlantationGrace Restored ~ Chicora Wood is a 1,000± acre historic rice plantation on the Pee Dee River in Georgetown, South Carolina’s Lowcountry.  The restored house and surrounding buildings are some of the finest preserved examples of historic rice plantation architecture and grounds in the state.  The 10,000± square foot, fully restored plantation house dates to the 1700’s, was remodeled and enlarged by the Allston family in 1838 and features ten bedrooms and eight-and-a-half baths and is situated overlooking the river, gardens, and is surrounded by majestic live oaks.  The plantation has tremendous and untapped recreational opportunities.  Water resources include nearly one mile of both sides of the Pee Dee, over two miles of Chapel Creek, and a two acre lake.  Of his seven plantations amounting to 13,500± acres, Chicora Wood was the chosen home place of Governor Allston in the 1800s.  Chicora Wood has an exclusive Plantersville Road address, shared with about a dozen other notable plantations such as Exchange, Rosebank, Arundel, Hasty Point, and Weymouth.  Like Chicora Wood, many of the nearby plantations have also placed conservation easements on their land, ensuring the integrity, grace, and charm of the neighborhood is preserved for generations to come.The Facts:1000± acre idyllic riverfront plantation located near Georgetown, South CarolinaNearly a mile of frontage on both sides of the Pee Dee RiverLocated on Plantersville Road, one of the premier plantation neighborhoods in the south, nearby to Rosebank, Exchange, Hasty Point, Weymouth and othersMeticulously restored 10,000± square foot 1838 plantation house featuring 10 bedrooms and 8.5 baths overlooking the river and surrounded by ancient live oaksSome of the best preserved plantation grounds and historic dependencies in the Lowcountry:   Rice mill and chimney, rice shipping barn, summer kitchen, brick smokehouse, schoolhouse, carriage house/barn, driver’s house, and gatekeeper’s lodgeFormal gardens designed in the 1930’s by Loutrel Briggs, landscape architect responsible for developing Charleston’s distinctive garden styleOther improvements include a carpentry shop, barn/boat shed, dock and boat ramp, tennis court, great road system, private bridge over Chapel Creek, plantation office, and additional equipment barnsApx 80 acres of old rice impoundments with well-maintained leveesOver two miles of frontage on both sides of Chapel CreekTwo-acre lakePrivate and serene with house set ¼ mile off Plantersville RoadJust a 20± minute boat ride to the historic seaport of GeorgetownThe river provides access to great fishing and recreational opportunities Very interesting template for developing duck, dove, and quail hunting opportunitiesIncredible turkey populations and lots of deerOne of seven plantations in a row protected by a conservation easementWell-documented provenance commencing with King George II’s land grant in 1730sOne of the most successful rice plantations of its timeChicora Wood served as the family seat for generations of the prominent Allston familyOf his seven plantations and 13,500 acres, Chicora was the most favored property of South Carolina Governor Robert F. W. AllstonThe property has only been sold (outside of family) three times since the King’s Grant of the 1730’s 
$325,000  •  480 acres
Check out this 480 acre farm located Southwest of Ulysses. These three 160-acre tracts are a perfect fit for the cattleman or farmer looking to grow their operation. These three tracts come from a mix of grass, recently expired CRP, or previously tilled farmland. A great investment for the recreational buyer that enjoys bird hunting. Contact Nathan Linin today for questions or to give this property a look.
$360,000  •  307 acres
Newly Listed is a great piece of tillable farmland in Grant County, KS. This piece features good soils with flat acreage prime for farming operations. Located west and north of Ulysses Kansas in the heart of agriculture, this piece is primed and ready for investors and farmers. The property is historically a neat venture with Bear Creek running right thru the heart of it from West to East dividing the property in half. Contact me today to discuss about the ability to add this parcel to your portfolio.
$1,650,000  •  162 acres
Alapay Coastal Ranch comprises 162± acres, situated on Alapay Way on the west side of Highway One, just 1 mile south of the town of Harmony and 6 miles north of Cayucos. With panoramic ocean views, Alapay Coastal Ranch is zoned Ag and in the Coastal Zone. Water is abundant with 3 wells. Once a part of the Rancho San Geronimo Land Grant, Alapay Coastal Ranch is unimproved and offers a blank canvas for your masterpiece. APN: 046-081-010
$650,000  •  160 acres
Check out this fine quarter and homestead just listed for sale. This farm and home is located Northwest of Ulysses, Kansas with approximately 147 acres of tillable farmland with water rights. This quarter has a water-well that produces roughly 250-300 gal/min and is known to be fertile cropland. Additionally, this farmstead comes turnkey with a custom built home, multiple outbuildings for all your farm equipment, and room to operate your farm business. The home features a 125' x 50' structure with 5 foot overhangs and a 2-car garage. Equipped with 4 bedrooms and 4 baths, this custom built home has features you won't find just anywhere and realistically, you have to see to appreciate. Open concept with an industrial style kitchen and stained concrete floors allows for easy preparation and low maintenance. The kitchen features a walk-in pantry with lots of room for your food needs. This home can dual purpose as a hunting lodge or other entertainment piece.
$999,000  •  43 acres
Price Reduced!Mimbres Valley Gila StationA slice of down under in the Gila! This Australian styled station ranch bordering the Black Range of the Gila National Forest may be the "Life on the Land" you've dreamed about. Located on the scenic byway, Trail of the Mountain Spirits, this Australian styled station offers riding or hiking out your back gate into millions of acres of the Gila National Forest on trails like the Dutchman Canyon and Powderhorn Ridge. Also home to some of the largest Rocky Mountain Elk in the country, the Gila is your backyard. This is living the dream!!!The ranch consists of 43 acres (2 deeded parcels) bordered on 2 sides by the Gila National Forest. The custom home is an "Australian Station Design" and features an 8' wrap around porch (3-sided) with an open floor plan design that is just the right size for easy living and easy care. The home is +/- 2080 sq. ft., single level, with 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. The kitchen has high end residential appliances, walk-in pantry and an island with seating. There's a fireplace in the great room with vaulted ceiling and 12' slider to the porch and patio that allow for great views of the forest and the resident elk. The home also has air conditioning, forced air heat plus radiant in-floor heat in the master bathroom and a patio with ramada for outdoor entertaining.The ranch is turnkey ready including, but definitely not limited to, the following features:125' x 75' covered riding arena with sand and rubber crumble footing, plus additional 25' of under cover storage for trailers and farm equipment. Could also be used for additional horse pens/stalls60' round pen2 pasture run-in shelters30+ acres of crossed fenced pasture into 10 separate pastures/turnouts, all with accessible water hydrants. Pastures are native grama grass.Barnmaster custom barn with 4 stalls each with partially covered paddocks, a center aisleA tack room, workshop and a wash rackAmple hay storage in barn with plenty of tool and equipment storage. GrowDome greenhouseHot tubSauna2-car garageFull RV hookupMost existing farm equipment will convey with purchase (inquire for list of equipment)The ranch has full electric plus a grid-tied solar system with a backup generator that supports the entire ranch and a security system.There are covenants for residential site-built homes but there is no HOA or HOA dues. Covenants do allow for an outfitter or Bed and Breakfast. This ranch is the consummate equestrian facility located in the hidden Mimbres Valley of Southwest New Mexico. The gentle four season climate, low tax base and country living attracts vacationers, 2nd residence homebuyers and full time retirees to this area. Silver City is an easy drive away with a Super Walmart, grocery and health food stores, a variety of restaurants, hospital, broad variety of physicians and alternative practitioners, Western New Mexico University and a very active arts community with a number of galleries in town featuring local artists. Additional recreational activities in the area are Lake Roberts for hiking & water activities, Gila Cliff Dwellings and access to the high country either on foot or horseback. Phoenix is 5-6 hours, Tucson is 4 hours, Albuquerque is 4 hours, El Paso is 3.25 hours. Grant County airport has nonstop service to Albuquerque and Phoenix. Make your lifestyle change today at the Mimbres Valley Gila Station. Call or email today for more info and a qualified showing. Co brokers welcome.Note: In order to confirm a showing, financial verification is required. Thank you.
$980,000  •  38.53 acres
Salt Creek Ranch, Grant County, New MexicoOn the Trail of the Mountain Spirits Scenic Byway, en route to the Gila Cliff Ruins Monument, above the gorgeous 72-acre Lake Roberts, lies the +/- 38-acre Salt Creek Ranch. Hidden up the Mimbres River Valley, about 40 minutes from Silver City, is an area that many have retired to with very low taxes, incredibly mild four-season climate, and 365 days a year of recreation. The ranch is just 4 hours to Albuquerque, 3.5 hours to Tucson, 3.5 hours to El Paso and 45 minutes from Silver City. Meticulously maintained as a contractor's family getaway, Salt Creek Ranch has most all the boxes checked. The property borders thousands of acres of the Gila National Forest, you can visit the Ruins, you're a few minutes from public Lake Roberts, which is stocked with trout and small mouth bass, and is turn-key ready for your weekend getaway, corporate retreat, recreational mecca, equestrian ranch, or the perfect family legacy ranch. Your private and secluded property has year-round access, full power and a backup generator. When you cross the creek, lined with monster cottonwoods and then opening up into a meadow, you'll be met by 1 to 3 coveys of Gambel's quail. Mule Deer (with landowner tags) elk and javelina all frequent the ranch. It would take years and thousands of dollars to duplicate the value that Salt Creek Ranch offers. Very few ranch properties come available in this area. The equipment list that will convey with the ranch includes a John Deere tractor & implements, Electric Polaris Ranger, jon boat and kayaks. The property has two permitted wells, allowing for +/-1.5 + 2.5 acre feet of water rights complete with water storage and irrigation system. IMPROVEMENTSRanch House: +/-2400 sq. ft. home has been recently improved with a great room, office, large entertaining island kitchen and immense master bedroom that overlooks the ranch pastures. The modern home has 1 bedroom, 2 baths, 2 fireplaces, is turn-key, is mostly furnished and allows for additional customizationGuest cabin: +/- 600 sq. ft. fully furnished. Approximately $7500 annual income. Large Multi-Bay Custom Framed Metal Building: Large 2-bay custom metal building with 2 electric doors, fully equipped shop with tools, and a single bedroom/bath apartment.8 Stall Custom Metal Horse BarnWood Building Housing Pump HouseComplete Fencing and Cross Fencing Why have a life dictated by traffic and congestion on your days off and/or retirement? With privacy, seclusion and world-class climate, Salt Creek Ranch may be the turnkey legacy escape that your family deserves. Call or email today for more information or a qualified showing. Co brokers welcome.Note: In order to confirm a showing, financial verification is required. Thank you.
$680,000  •  34 acres
34 acres m/l of prime industrial development land located along Hwy 69 on the north side Osceola, Iowa. Site has exclusive access to Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) Main Rail Line via BNSF Spur. All utility infrastructure is available to Site. Generous tax incentives and exemptions available thr
Reduced
$149,000  •  34 acres
$199,000
Hard-to-find 32 acre recreational retreat minutes out of the historic city of Hico in North central Texas. Legend has it that Billy the Kid did not die in Fort Sumner in 1881 but instead moved to Hico under an alias “Brushy Bill” Roberts and lived there until 1950. In Hico there are numerous very good restaurants, an old-fashioned ice cream parlor and the city has its own chocolate factory. The Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex is within an easy two hour driving distance making it readily accessible for a family gathering destination, a weekend getaway or just sneaking out for a morning/afternoon hunt. This property has great cover for wildlife which includes Whitetail deer, feral hogs, Rio Grande Turkey and various small game/predators. The adjacent landowner’s property fronts year-round Duffau Creek and they said that they would grant access to the creek for fishing for the new owner of this property. Electricity is readily available – seller will need to dig a water well if desired. Some minerals will convey.
Contact for Price  •  11.5 acres
This Selkirk Island Riverfront property represents the last bulk riverfront lot development opportunity next to the proven Selkirk Subdivision. The deed restricted Selkirk development has long been a popular location for sportsmen, known for its outstanding river fishing for speckled trout and redfi