Cash McWhorter


Cash McWhorter was raised in Marshall, Texas, and developed an appreciation of fishing and hunting at an early age. While growing up in east Texas, in addition to his outdoor hobbies, Cash worked in the oil field gaining knowledge of land and natural resources during the summers. After college and a two-year stint as a recruiter in Kansas City, Cash returned to Texas to work for Colliers International, the third largest global real estate firm. For ten years he worked in corporate real estate, representing numerous local businesses and fortune 500 companies. In June 2010, Cash left Colliers International to start Ranch Capital Group, a fund formed to purchase recreational ranches as investments, all located within two hours of the Dallas/Fort Worth area. During that time, Cash was able to design and construct multiple water features, enact controlled burns, restore native grasses with land clearing and brush eradication practices, develop and enhance hundreds of acres of managed wetlands, work with NRCS on a number of projects, drill water wells and install irrigation piping to wetlands, establish wetland management programs, plant food plots, construct new fences, roads, and homes. His main passion is waterfowl and he has used the previous skills to develop multiple waterfowl properties. In December 2011, Cash joined Hortenstine Ranch Company as a business partner to Blake Hortenstine. Cash puts to use his vast land knowledge, corporate real estate insight, ownership and management of previous properties to provide a level of impeccable service when representing his clients in buying or selling ranches.
$1,206,630  •  468.59 acres
Location: Sanders Creek Ranch is located northwest of Sumner, Texas, in northwestern Lamar County. Situated approximately 2 hours from Dallas, Texas (~112 miles), and 2.5 hours from Ft. Worth, Texas, the nearest towns are Sumner, Texas, (7 miles SE) and Paris, Texas, (17 miles SE). Improved gravel road access to the ranch's entry gate is provided by County Road 35420.Address: 821 County Road 35420, Sumner, TX, 75486.Overview: Located at the end of a county road, the 468.594 +/- acre Sanders Creek Ranch is a well-manicured recreational ranch rich in hunting, fishing, and water features. This multipurpose ranch has been used primarily for a family retreat and general recreation. The functional lodge, both barns, archery range and fire pit area lie in a park like setting directly above the 5 +/- acre lake, the 12.5 +/- acre, managed duck slough and 11 +/- acres of planted pines. Additionally, the ranch boasts seven (7) developed wetland units, eleven (11) established food plots and 1.64 +/- miles of the hardwood lined tributary, Little Creek. This recreational paradise is bordered by Sanders Creek for the entirety of the northern boundary, approximately 2.93 +/- miles. The property's setting is private and peaceful, yet still offering excitement for the entire family through the stocked 5 +/- acre lake, the numerous waterfowl impoundments and an MLD managed deer herd.Lodge & Ranch Headquarters: The Sanders Creek Ranch lodge is a well - constructed steel frame structure with an r-panel exterior covering approximately 1,500 +/- square feet. The interior of the lodge combines comfortable and functional living spaces including a spacious kitchen, dining/den/living area, storage loft, laundry room and a bunk room (sleeps 6) with attached bathroom. A porch on the north side of the lodge offers expansive views of the duck slough, planted pine and 5 +/- acre lake. WIFI, satellite TV and internet are all installed at the lodge.Other Improvements: Near the lodge, stand two new r-panel barns, partially enclosed and partially open air, measuring ~65'x30' and ~50'x30' with utilities. The bigger of the two barns is 3/4 open with the remaining 1/4 enclosed and locked behind a garage door. The smaller barn is fully open air on the front with an attached drive-thru garage for tractor, ATV or equipment storage on the back.At the headquarters and behind the house is a bow range to make final adjustments before the hunt, and a garden shed for tool storage.Managed Wetland and Wetland Units: The managed wetland is a duck slough measuring 12.5 +/- acres in size. The wetland can be drained of all water each spring via a single screw-gate drain installed at the lowest point of the wetland system. This management system allows for the maximum amount of forage for waterfowl in the winter months. Additionally, within the WRP acreage are 7 other developed wetland units ranging in size from ~1-3 acres.Topography: Topography on Sanders Creek Ranch ranges from a high point of 587' above sea level at the southeast corner of the property, to a low of 470' above sea level along Sanders Creek, a change in elevation of 117'. The lodge sits on one of the highest points of the ranch, overlooking some of the property's best features.Wildlife/Hunting: Sanders Creek Ranch boasts a strong native Whitetail deer population currently under an MLDP Level III management plan. Eleven (11) cultivated food plots attract and hold deer on the ranch.In the winter, migrating waterfowl are found in abundant numbers on the property; Wood Ducks, Mallards, Pintails, Gadwalls, and other puddle ducks use Sanders Creek as a wintering home.Unique and uncommon for NE Texas the ranch includes a growing population of Eastern Turkeys that were released by the National Wild Turkey Federation within 3 miles of the ranch. Other species of wildlife include wild hogs, dove, and various indigenous species of varmints, toads, lizards, birds, and insects. The ecosystem on Sanders Creek Ranch is both diverse and thriving. Fishing opportunities abound in the stocked and managed 5+/- acre fishing lake.Water: The northern boundary of the property is formed by Sanders Creek for approx. 2.93+/- miles, and a tributary of Sanders Creek, Little Creek, traverses through the eastern side of property for approx. 1.64 +/- miles. Additionally, seven (7) waterfowl impoundments are enrolled in the intensive and perpetual WRP program to provide habitat for migratory waterfowl in the winter. A 5 +/- acre lake is stocked and primed for enjoyment by the next owner. The amount of surface water on the property is impressive, as are the dams, concrete spillway and levees constructed to hold and control that surface water.Easements: Wetland Restoration Program (WRP) easement affects 293.8 +/- acres of the property, see map for approximate acreage encumbered by easement.Mineral Rights: Surface only.Utilities: Electricity is provided by Lamar Electric Cooperative. Lamar County Water Supply District is the rural water supply provider.School District: North Lamar Independent School District.Taxes: Property is under a Wildlife Tax exemption. Property taxes for 2018 were approx. $1,669.09.Exclusions: Equipment, Shed, Deer Stands/Feeders and Furniture are not included in the sale of the property. A tractor, bush hog and disc could be purchased separately if desired.Price:$1,206,629.55 or $2575 per acreContact:Cash McWhorter-Partner/Broker, (469) 222-4076Chris Wengierski-Agent, (214) 707-3474Blake Hortenstine-Partner/Broker, (214) 616-1305
$1,969,961  •  657 acres
Overview: The Carlile Hunting Club is an exceptional 657+/- acre well-watered recreational hunting ranch, located in the piney woods of NE Texas. This Harrison County ranch comes with a variety of well-built amenities, a history of monster low fence whitetail genetics, stories of local Caddo Indians and rumors of the founders of Texas and participants of the Alamo passing through the ranch on the Trammel's Trace Trail which is believed to run diagonally through the north side the ranch. The 657+/- acres boasts crystal clear springs bubbling out of the ground, spring-fed lakes, wide variety of mature hardwoods, managed plantation pine, diverse plant life and strategically located food plots providing exceptional hunting opportunities for deer, hogs, waterfowl and turkey.Located on a high point of the ranch, overlooking the Haggerty Creek bottom and a 13.6+/- acre spring fed bass lake, is the main lodge set amongst towering pines and a wide variety of mature hardwoods. The activity list on this ranch is endless. Guests should be prepared for timeless memories with fun for all to be had all while trap shooting, skeet shooting, pen raised upland bird hunting, largemouth bass fishing, ATV riding on over 15 miles of highly manicured trails that rival most county roads, visits to Caddo Lake, downtown Marshall, TX "Wonderland of Lights" at Christmas, Jefferson, TX "Antique Capital of Texas" or simply relaxing on the back deck of the main lodge viewing a pristine setting taking in the sounds of nature.Location/Local Touring Attractions: The Carlile Hunting Club is located ~8 miles east of the quaint town of Marshall, Texas, home of George Foreman and Y.A. Tittle. From Dallas, the drive is ~ 150 +/- miles (2 hr. 20 min); from Shreveport, the drive is ~35 miles (less than 45 min.).Being located between Marshall, TX and the famous Caddo Lake, the only natural lake in the State of Texas, the ranch is surrounded by unique local attractions. Caddo Lake is certainly a must for all family and guests staying at the ranch. Caddo Lake (named after the Caddo Indians), located on the banks of Big Cypress Bayou is the legendary Big Pines Lodge, where at one time one could purchase guns, ammo, hunting/fishing license, "to die for" fried catfish and jalapeno hush puppies topped off with a freezer cold Big "O". Harris Lake Road, known to locals as Stagecoach Road, clips the NW corner of the ranch is a timeless masterpiece of East Texas. The sandy bottom road was a highly traveled corridor for stagecoach traffic located on a ridgeline between Haggerty and Deboldin Creek. The amount of traffic caused by wooden wagon wheels is evident by the high cut banks towering above on each side as you travel through this unforgettable setting. Martha Josey, a professional World Champion Barrel Racer in 1980, leads camps and coaches young barrel racers at her ranch that borders the west boundary of the Carlile Hunting Club.Directions: From Dallas- take I-20 east for 114 miles then take exit 614 for TX-43 toward Marshall. Turn left onto TX-43 toward Marshall/Caddo Lake and continue for 6.4 miles on highway 43. Then turn left onto East End Blvd S for 1.74 miles then turn right on highway 43 and continue for ~ 8 miles where Carlile Hunting Club will be located on the right.The Lodge: The 2-master suite, 3.5 bath 3,300 +/- SF lodge with an additional 8-bed bunkroom for larger parties graces a hilltop surrounded by mature pine trees and hardwood park like setting. A large wooden wrap around back deck overlooks a majestic ~13.6 Acre East Texas black water lake surrounded by a beautiful mature tree canopy. When coming in for the night after a successful day on your private lake you can park your boat and leave all your fishing gear in the single stall boathouse equipment with a fully automated electric boat lift.Surface Water: The Carlile Hunting Club features exceptional recreational surface water including a 13.6 Ac. lake, a ~6.77 Ac. lake, and a ~2.73 Ac. lake all being stocked with black bass. These lakes have the potential to produce a legendary East Texas Bass. The property also features a ~10.77 Ac. wetland designed for the avid duck hunter. Over 1.5 miles of the sandy bottom Haggerty Creek also runs through the property and is a significant creek with a beautiful hardwood canopy surrounding it. Additionally, there are two potential lake sites located north of the main lodge being approximately 4.5+/- & 6.0+/- acres in size.Shooting: The avid shooter will want to hone their shooting skills by utilizing the fully automated trap and skeet range, the skeet range includes both a high and low house. Additionally there is an air-conditioned skeet room with a half-bath and refrigerator for breaks between friendly yet highly competitive shoots.Hunting: For hunting purposes the property also features (2) 1,200 SF flight pens, a 5,000 SF flight pen, and concrete dog kennels. In the past pen raised quail, pheasant, and chucker have been released in the northwest field, making for an excellent hunting experience. Behind the barn there is also a smokehouse and winch for your game processing and preparing needs. There are also a number of deer blinds, feeders, and over 18 acres of food plots that have been maintained and managed to attract deer, hogs, and turkey.Wildlife: In terms of wildlife the Carlile Hunting Club has it all. The ranch has a history of monster low-fence whitetail genetics. The topography, diverse, and thick cover provides an excellent habitat for deer growth. The phenomenal cover also provides a home for feral hogs, and Eastern Turkeys. The property's water assets provide duck hunting opportunities that rival the best in East Texas.Caddo Lake: The only natural lake in Texas, the ~26,000-acre lake surrounded by giant bald cypress trees covered in Spanish moss provide a Texas treasure that holds alligators, bass, catfish, and crappie. The lake record Black Bass is a staggering 16.17 lbs.Topography: The topography is undulating throughout the ranch with significant elevation changes surrounding the creeks and ridges on the property. The ranch has a high point of ~340 feet above sea level and a low of ~245 feet above sea level.History: Marshall, Texas founded in 1841 was once the 4th largest city in Texas. Marshall was a key town throughout the Civil War and even became the western capital of the confederacy after the fall of Vicksburg. After the Civil War, Marshall was a key town due to the Texas & Pacific Railway which connected Marshall, TX to San Diego, CA. Trammel's Trace, a trail used by David Crockett, Sam Houston, and many other Americans migrating to Texas is believed to run diagonally through the north side the ranch. Trammel's Trace was the second major route into Spanish Texas from the United States and the first route from the northern boundaries along the Red River. In the early 1800's Trammel's Trace was a smugglers' trail, but later became a path for immigration to Texas. Stage Coach Rd., is a beautiful road near the property, which was the main artery between Shreveport and Marshall prior to the Civil War. The high dirt walls are a testament to the age and history of the road. The Caddo Indians also frequented the area around the ranch. Indian artifacts such as arrowheads have been found around the lodge which overlooks the Haggerty Creek bottom. Click to read the following historical articles from the area:Trammel's Trace Historical MarkerHarrison County's Stagecoach Road gets New Historical MarkerEasements: One pipeline easement runs through the middle of the ranch which has been used for deer hunting opportunities. Two electrical easements: one runs along a portion of the south boundary and the second to the lodge.Utilities: Electricity is provided by Panola-Harrison Electric Cooperative, and water provided by Leigh WSC and a deep water well.Taxes: 2018 taxes were $4,089.08Timber: The Carlile Hunting Club has a timber management plan in place and has a timber Ag exemption.Minerals: Surface Only, no minerals are being conveyed with the sale.Price: $1,969,961.25 ($2,995/Acre)Broker Comments: "Being from Marshall, this is the ranch that I was fortunate enough to spend a lot of time on hunting and fishing as a young man. I have many fond memories of the ranch, including my pastor harvesting a monster 24 point low fence whitetail off the ranch just down the pipeline from where I was hunting! This is where I developed my passion for the outdoors and a special place in my heart. It will be hard to see it change hands but I look forward to meeting the new owner to share some of the many memories from the field." -Cash McWhorter.Contact:Cash McWhorter- Broker/Partner(469) 222-4076 mobileStephen Schwartz- Agent(903) 738-7882 mobile
$1,550,000  •  700 acres
Comments: It is no hidden secret that Oklahoma has become the premier destination for waterfowl hunters across the country. Central Oklahoma is now a known stopping point for the majority of the Central Flyway. The Brier Creek Waterfowl Preserve represents a rare opportunity to own an exceptional w
$24,500,000  •  2,245 acres
Valley Lake Ranch consists of 2,245+/- acres including a MASSIVE, PRIVATE LAKE yielding approximately 1,080+/- surface acres (at max capacity) of pristine water at normal elevation including 15,000 acre feet of adjudicated impoundment rights. Set amongst scenic rolling terrain immediately south of the Red River Basin, this very unique property combines heavily wooded oak and elm forests, clear rights of way, notable elevation change, excellent build sites, a proven fishery with desirable lake level consistency and amazing water clarity. Raw land and expansive water combine to form a recreational oasis and blank canvas that is virtually impossible to duplicate.Purchase Offer Criterion: Seller has requested that all offers for purchase of the property: (a) be submitted by no later than 5:00 p.m. (CST) on October 12, 2018; (b) be submitted on the form of Purchase Contract that is included in this property information packet; (c) state that the offer remains in effect until 5:00 p.m. (CST) on October 19, 2018; and (d) be accompanied by either: (i) a letter of financial capabilities from a banking institution on bank letter head verifying that the Purchaser has available cash and/or a line of credit in an amount in excess of the offer amount; or (ii) a copy of a bank statement confirming that the Purchaser has available cash in an amount in excess of the offer amount.Location: Valley Lake Ranch is located on the county line between Fannin & Grayson Counties ~15 miles east of Sherman, Texas, 10 miles east of Bonham, TX, and 70 miles north of Dallas, Texas. Paved road frontage in two locations insure reliable access.Fannin & Grayson County Information: Fannin and Grayson Counties are located in Northeast Texas adjacent to the Oklahoma border. Bonham and Sherman, the respective county seats, are located a convenient fifty to sixty miles north/northeast of Dallas. . The topography is variable including with ranges of moderately rolling hills, creek drainages and pinch points throughout the area. General elevations in Fannin and Grayson Counties range from ~500 to ~700 feet above sea level. The average annual rainfall is approximately forty-three inches. The predominate water drainage basins are the Red River and Bois D' Arc Creek. Natural tree cover consists primarily of oak, hickory, ash, walnut, pecan, cottonwood, elm, cedar and Bois D' Arc trees.Airports: There are multiple airports with convenient proximity to Valley Lake Ranch, including an airstrip on the property. The landing strip on the ranch is found on a peninsula abutting the lake, measuring approximately 2,771' long and 30' wide. The airstrip is not currently registered with the FAA and would require updates to make it operational.Located 22 miles West of the Valley Lake Ranch gate, North Texas Regional Airport / Perrin Field (KGYI) is a full service, city-owned airport located east of Sherman and Denison. Grayson County's airport has four (4) runways, measuring up to approximately 9000' long by 150' wide.Jones Field Airport in Bonham, Texas is a public airport located ~12 miles east of the Valley Lake Ranch gate. Two airstrips are located there, measuring up to approximately 4000' long by 75' wide.Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport is a full service, international airport located 76 miles SW of Valley Lake Ranch.Hospitals: Red River Regional Hospital is located in Bonham, Texas, ~14 miles east of the Valley Lake Ranch gate.Baylor Scott and White Hospital in Sherman, Texas is located a convenient ~14 miles west of the ranch via Highway 82.School District: Bells ISD (Grayson County) and Savoy ISD (Fannin County)Valley Dam and Valley Lake Reservoir: An expansive and impressive body of water, Valley Lake (also known as Brushy Creek Reservoir) is an off-channel reservoir. The lake has a storage capacity of 15,000 acre-feet at normal (Conservation) pool with a maximum storage capacity being 26,500 at the top of the dam. The lake encompasses a surface area capacity of 1,080+/- acres at the normal elevation of 611 feet above mean sea level. A drainage basin consisting of approximately 8 square miles of land contributes water to feed Valley Lake. Maximum depth located thus far is estimated to be 38 feet using standard consumer boat mounted depth finders. Based on aerial imagery from February 1995 through March 2014, the average water surface acreage was 992.6 +/- acres with an average of ~22.35 miles of lake frontage. Based on the same aerial imagery, it is estimated that the lake fluctuated between ~933 surface acres and ~1,016 surface acres.Valley Lake Dam History: Valley Dam, which forms Valley Lake, was authorized by the State of Texas in 1959. Construction of the dam was completed in 1961 to provide a cooling water reservoir for the operation of the Valley Steam Electric Station. A Certificate of Adjudication authorized an impoundment of up to 15,000 acre feet of water. The plant has been decommissioned and deconstructed. Valley Dam is a 2,770' long homogeneous earth fill embankment with a maximum height of 55 feet above the original streambed. The impressive and well-engineered dam looks west at sunset, providing amazing views off of Valley Lake.Dam Report: Freese and Nichols, Inc. conducted a dam inspection on September 26, 2017, and provided an updated report in December, 2017 for Valley Lake Dam.Dam Project Description- Valley Dam was authorized by the State of Texas, Permit No. 1939 in 1959. A Certificate of Adjudication authorized an impoundment of up to 15,000 acre-feet of water for industrial purposes. Construction of the dam was completed in 1961 to provide a cooling water reservoir for operation of the Valley Steam Electric Station. The power plant has been decommissioned and demolished.Valley Dam is a 2,770-foot long homogeneous earth fill embankment with a maximum height of 55 feet above the original streambed. The crest of the dam is at elevation 617.5 feet. The upstream slope is 3H:1V with an 8-foot-wide berm at elevation 600 feet. The upstream slope is protected by 24-inch rock riprap from the berm to the crest. The downstream slope is 2.5H:1V with grass slope protection and a 12-foot-wide berm at elevation 590 feet. Seepage control within the embankment is provided by an 18-inch thick sand blanket drain that intersects the toe of the embankment on the downstream slope. The downstream slope has a longitudinal concrete- lined flume (v-ditch) on the berm to collect surface runoff from the upper portion of the slope. Flow in the longitudinal flume is conveyed to the toe of the embankment via four transverse concrete-lined flumes. No instrumentation or survey monitoring programs exist for Valley Dam.The low flow outlet, made operational as of May 2018, consists of an 18-inch diameter gate valve controlled concrete pipe with an upstream invert elevation of 605.75 feet and is located at Station 21+00, near the right abutment of the embankment. The discharge area is protected with a concrete V- shaped channel.The service spillway is a 200-foot wide, concrete-lined channel located in the right abutment with a crest elevation of 611 feet. Two lines of baffle blocks provide energy dissipation at the end of the concrete-lined channel, approximately 50 feet downstream from the crest. The service spillway is separated at its left side by natural topography from the right abutment of the main embankment. There is no emergency spillway at Valley Dam.In Texas, the TCEQ is the regulatory agency responsible for the administration of State dam safety laws. Dams are classified according to the size of the dam and the potential for loss of human life and property damage downstream from the dam in the event of a breach of the dam. The size classification of small, intermediate, or large is based on the storage in the reservoir and the height of the embankment. Intermediate size dams are those with maximum storage between 1,000 and 50,000 acre-feet and/or a maximum height between 40 and 100 feet. Valley Dam, which has a maximum height of 55 feet and maximum storage of 26,500 acre-feet at the top of the dam, is an intermediate size dam.The hazard classification can be low, significant or high. A high hazard dam is usually located where failure can cause serious damage to agricultural, industrial, and commercial facilities, important public utilities, main highways, and railroads. TCEQ criteria define a high hazard structure as one which could potentially impact three or more residential structures, or result in probable loss of seven or more lives. The area downstream of Valley Dam is primarily agricultural land in the floodplain of Brushy Creek and the Red River. There are, however, more than three homes located along Farm to Market (FM) Road 1753 near Brushy Creek about 3.6 miles downstream of the dam, and numerous houses further downstream in the Red River floodplain. The FM 1752 and FM 1753 bridges over Brushy Creek would also be overtopped in the event of a breach of the dam. Valley Dam is therefore classified as a high hazard dam.According to State criteria, as an intermediate size, high hazard dam Valley Dam is required to pass 88 percent of the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF). As determined by the probable maximum flood study and breach analysis completed by Freese and Nichols, Inc. in 2005, Valley Dam passes 100 percent of the PMF event, and is thus hydraulically adequate in its current condition.A full Freese & Nichols, Inc. report, dated December 2017, containing specific details concerning maintenance and repair recommendations can be made available to prequalified Buyers upon request.Terrain:Topography at Valley Lake Ranch is impressive with over 100 feet of elevation change. The high point of ~671feet above mean sea level is found in the southeast corner of the property, and a low point of ~566 feet is found in the northeast corner. The property is mostly treed with sporadic native pastureland desirable for grazing cattle. The landscape lends itself well to recreational land. Highly desirable building sites exist around much of the lake as sunsets and sunrises are truly remarkable from many points overlooking this impressive body of water.Additional Water Sources: There are 3 earthen water wells located on the property. The Neches River Basin aquifer is found below Valley Lake Ranch.A rural water line runs into the approximate center of the ranch from County Road 1752.Brushy creek flows from the northeast corner of the property into Valley Lake.Wildlife: Valley Lake Ranch is home to Whitetail deer, feral hogs, Bald Eagles, dove, Rio Grande Turkey, bobcats, coyotes and of course, waterfowl. Since its inception in 1961, migratory waterfowl have utilized Valley Lake as a wintering ground during peak migration. Features including a major body of water in the central flyway, coupled with natural wetlands in close proximity to the Red River, attract migratory waterfowl populations during peak migration.Fisheries: Valley Lake has proven to be a prolific fishery. Our team fished Valley Lake for 3 days and 6 fishermen caught over 300 Largemouth Bass. Notable fish caught included seven fish over 8 lbs., 4 fish over 7 lbs and 40+ fish between 5-7 lbs. This natural fishery will serve as a solid foundation primed for the next owner to introduce a fish management program capable of contending with the list of renowned and legendary North Texas Bass Fisheries. Additional species of fish caught by the HRC team include Sand Bass, Crappie, Drum and Channel Catfish.Recreation: Water depths at Valley Lake range from highs up to approximately 38 feet and all depths in between that and the shoreline. Multiple coves, inlets, and creek channels compliment open water to create a spectacular, broad recreational offering. In addition to sport fishing and hunting, Valley Lake lends well to jet skiing, water skiing, sail boating, scuba diving, and general motor boating. Kayaking and float fishing can be excellent in the coves and inlets on the lake.Noted Whitetail deer populations, tree cover, topography and natural forbs provide ample opportunity for bow hunting. Fertile soils and sub soils on the property may yield high quality improved wildlife food plots to supplement natural forage components and/or cultivated crops to benefit migratory bird hunting.Fencing: The perimeter of Valley Lake Ranch is fenced. Fencing is in fair to good conditionElectricity: Residential electricity runs into the property and is available at multiple points on or near the boundary of the ranch.Minerals: Surface only.Leases: The property is currently leased for grazing.Taxes: Annual property taxes for 2017 are in the process of being verified. Some of the property carries an Agriculture Exemption.Buyers & Brokers: Buyer's Broker must be present for all showings. Buyers should notify Listing Broker at first contact that they are represented by a cooperating real estate Broker prior to touring the property. We welcome the opportunity to work with other real estate Brokers and their Agents, who are active and currently licensed in the state of Texas.Comments: Exemplifying the real estate term "relative scarcity," Valley Lake Ranch is an unprecedented opportunity to own an expansive, private lake in the heart of North Texas. Proximity to the two major metropolitan areas encompassing Dallas and Fort Worth, prove this ranch a fantastic investment and recreational ranch owning opportunity, while the natural fishery represents a phenomenal experience for the angler at heart!*Please also note our listing entitled Lake Creek Ranch for an additional large water offering. Seller to consider joint offers submitted for both Valley Lake Ranch and Lake Creek Ranch.*Price: $24,500,000Contact:Cash McWhorter- Broker/Partner469.222.4076 mobileCasey Berley- Broker- ALC214.422.7253 mobileBlake Hortenstine- Broker/Partner214.616.1305 mobile
$16,000,000  •  1,833 acres
Property Description: 1833.536+/- acres with a HUGE PRIVATE 550+/- ACRE LAKE set amongst scenic rolling terrain heavily wooded in oak and elm forests. Clear right-of-ways, scenic elevation change and excellent building locations. Raw land with limited improvements allows for a blank canvas to with endless possibilities.Area Historical Information: McLennan County is deep seeded in history with the first Spanish exploring expedition in 1721 by Marques de San Miguel de Aguayo. Records show that during his expedition he camped near the Brazos River and a major tributary, Bosque, Spanish for woods.Multiple native Indian tribes lived and roamed the area and was occupied by three main tribes - Caddo, Tonkawa and three branches of the Wichita - Tawakoni, Towash and Waco. The Tonkawas were the most predominant in number and referred to as "Tonks" by the European settlers. They lived in skin tents and followed bison, deer and other small animals. They were considered to be roaming hunter/gatherers which provided for many conflicts by the neighboring Comanche to the west.Further settlement of the area began in 1837 when Fort Fisher, a Texas Ranger outpost, was established but abandoned a few months later. Waco Village was later built on the site of an ancient agricultural village of the Waco Indians. A two-league grant of land by Gen. Thomas J Chambers was the start of development in the area where land was sold for a dollar an acre. The Chisolm Trail later crossed at a shallow ford in the Brazos River where the town of Kimball was formed, west of Waco. In 1845, Neil McLennan moved onto land on the South Bosque River. In 1850, named after Neil McLennan, McLennan County was carved out of the Milam District and the same year Universal Immigration Company of England purchased 27,000 acres from Richard Kimball where 30 families were sent to settle the area. Bosque County was officially formed in February 1854 from McLennan County totaling 989 square miles. European settlers began to populate the area in 1854 when the State of Texas offered 320 acres to each family that would settle the new county, and Norwegians took advantage of the offer believing the area to be much like Norway. In 1856, Waco Village was incorporated as the town of Waco, and a new county courthouse was erected that year. By 1859, there were 749 people living in Waco.Location: Located in eastern McLennan County, Lake Creek Reservoir is on Manos Creek in the Brazos River basin approximately four miles west of Riesel, TX. It is located approximately 12 miles east of Waco, ~100 miles from Dallas/Fort Worth, ~110 miles from Austin & ~165 from Houston, Texas.Directions: From Waco, go East on Highway 6 toward Riesel. Prior to arriving in Riesel turn south on FM 1860 going approximately ~5 miles to the first main gate on the left. Just past this gate the lake can be partially seen on the left. FM 1860 continues around the ranch and ties back into Hwy 6 in Riesel, TX.Lake Creek Reservoir: This is a superior body of water constructed by Austin Road Company in 1953. There were no expenses spared at the time of construction. The water clarity is very good being in limestone based land. The lake is considered a magnificent recreational lake. There are 3 primary drainage basins with Manos Creek being the primary source of run-off water. The lake boasts multiple scenic coves, a magnificent tree covered island in the center of the lake, deep water shorelines and duck habitat in the backwaters of the lake making this an extremely versatile body of water in an area not known to have large lakes. Maximum depth is estimated to be ~35' at the deepest point with fourteen square miles of drainage feeding the lake. Based on aerial imagery from 2005-2015 the average water surface acreage was 442.475+/- acres with an average of 9.7+/- miles of lake frontage. Also based on aerial imagery, it is estimated that the lake fluctuated between ~343 surface acres and ~555 surface acres with only three of the last ten years being less than ~400 acres. Lake Creek is a desirable lake even at lower lake levels with some of the shorelines being gravel based and blossom with native grasses providing for a clean and scenic shoreline. Fluctuation of lake level is not believed to have any impact on the quality of the reservoir.Lake Dam History: A Water Right Permit dated May 10, 1951 was granted by the State Board of Water Engineers to Texas Power and Light for constructing the reservoir. Austin Road Company began construction on September 8, 1951 and the dam was completed May 1952. Impoundment of water began in June 1952 by runoff inflow from approximately 14 square miles. The first generating unit began commercial operation April 2, 1953. The dam is highly engineered and well-constructed with an estimated cost in 1952 of $10.8M. On January 26, 1972 the permitted water capacity was reduced from 9,500 acre-feet to its now current level of 8,500 acre-feet at 405 ft above msl. Lake Creek previously operated as a natural gas fired power plant which has since been completely removed and remediated. It was in operation from 1953 to 2010.Water rights:Impoundment limit - 8,500 acre feetPermitted Consumptive Rights - 10,000 acre feetMaximum Make-Up Water per year from the Brazos River - 8,996 acre feetWater is pumped via through a pipeline from a pump station located on the Brazos River in close proximity to the lake.Dam Report: Freese and Nichols, Inc conducted a dam inspection on July 18, 2017 and provided a report dated November 2017 of the Lake Creek Dam (a full report can be made available to pre-qualified Buyers). The following is the "Project Description":Lake Creek Dam was completed in 1952 to provide a cooling reservoir for the operation of Lake Creek Steam Electric Station. The dam consists of a homogenous, earthen embankment with a length of 1,860 feet and a maximum height of 50 feet above the original streambed. Based on the 2003 inspection report, the dam's crest elevation varies from 409.75 to 410.25 feet-msl. The normal pool of Lake Creek Reservoir is elevation 402 feet-msl. The embankment has side slopes of 2.5 Horizontal to 1 Vertical (2.5H:1V) for both the upstream and downstream slopes. The upstream slope of the embankment is protected by a 1-foot thick layer of rock riprap underlain by a 1-foot thick gravel bedding layer extending from the crest to elevation 395 feet-msl (seven feet below normal pool elevation). A 4-inch thick layer of gravel protects the downstream slope. Lake Creek Dam originally had no internal seepage collection system; however, a toe drain system consisting of a 6-inch perforated PVC pipe placed in a gravel filter and surrounded by filter fabric was installed in 2007 along the downstream toe of the embankment.Discharge from the reservoir are controlled by two 20-foot tall by approximately 32.75-foot wide radial gates at the left (south) abutment. The service spillway transitions into a 40-foot wide concrete chute, stilling basin, and outfall channel. The top elevation of the spillway gates is 405 feet-msl in the closed position, and the crest of the ogee weir at the gates is elevation 385 feet-msl. An uncontrolled earthen emergency spillway with a crest elevation of 406 feet-msl and a width of 523 feet is located in the right (north) abutment of the dam.In Texas, the TCEQ is the regulatory agency responsible for the administration of state dam safety laws. Dams are classified according to the size of the dam and the potential for loss of human life and property damages downstream from the dam in the event of a breach of the dam. The size classification of small, intermediate, or large is based on the storage in the reservoir and the height of the dam. Intermediate size dams are those with a maximum storage between 1,000 and 50,000 acre-feet and/or a height greater than 40 ft and less than 100 ft. With a height of 50 feet and a top of the dam storage of 11,700 acre feet Lake Creek Dam is classified as an intermediate size structure.A dam's hazard classification can be low, significant, or high based on the downstream risks in the event of a failure. The area downstream of the dam consists primarily of undeveloped land in the floodplain of Manos Creek. Farm-to-Market Road 1860 crosses the spillway discharge channel downstream of the dam. The confluence of Manos Creek and the Brazos River is located approximately 0.6 miles downstream of the dam. Based on a visual review there are a few scattered homes located downstream of the dam; however, they appear to be located at an elevation which would likely not be in the inundation zone. Farm-to-Market Road 1860 would be classified as a minor highway; however, since it was observed to be as a school bus route, it would be considered a secondary highway. TCEQ criteria define a significant hazard structure as one where failure can cause appreciable economic loss to isolated homes, secondary highways, minor railroads, and public utilities or which could potentially impact one to six lives or involve two or fewer habitable structures. Lake Creek Dam is currently classified as a significant hazard dam.According to State criteria, an intermediate size, significant hazard structure is required to pass 56 percent of the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) based on the height and storage parameters of Lake Creek Dam. As determined by an August 2013 hydraulic study performed by FNI, Lake Creek Dam passes 87 percent of the PMF event without overtopping the embankment. Therefore, the dam is considered hydraulically adequate.Inspection Summary Report: A full Freese & Nichols, Inc. report, dated November 2017, containing specific details in connection with minor repair recommendations can be made available to prequalified Buyers upon request.Terrain: Terrain is scenic with ~120' of elevation change. Property is mostly treed with sporadic native pastureland desirable for grazing cattle. The landscape lends itself to be considered recreational land. There are highly desirable scenic views/building sites from the southernmost hilltops overlooking Lake Creek Reservoir.Water Wells: There are two known water wells on the property. One water well is believed to be ~685 feet producing approximately 248 gallons per minute (gpm). The second well is believed to be approximately ~700 feet producing approximately 245 gallons per minute (gpm). Neither of the wells are believed to operational currently but there is no reason to believe they could not be put back into use.Other Surface Water: Several small ancillary stock tanks exist as well as one small lake being approximately 3.5+/- surface acres that is partially shared with a neighbor.Wildlife: Wildlife is an untouched and untapped resource. There are whitetail deer, abundant dove, feral hogs, squirrels, bobcats, coyotes, and a variety of songbirds. Migratory waterfowl have been seen in large numbers, have never been hunted and use the lake as a wintering ground during peak migration being located just off the banks of the Brazos River, being a major flyway in the Central Flyway.Fisheries: While Lake Creek has never officially been stocked there seems to be an abundance and wide variety of fish species that have naturally been stocked and reproduced in the lake. The fish that were caught and observed while filming were largemouth bass, catfish and bluegill. The fish habitat and lake appear to be prime for fish management and additional stocking/management.Fencing: The perimeter is fenced and there is no functional cross fencing. Condition of the fencing is fair to good. A 6' chain-link fence was constructed below the dam and has been well maintained and presently in very good condition.Access: There are ten (10) gated access points into the ranch, all are secure and the lake is virtually unused. There are multiple heavy duty pipe entrances into the ranch. Manos Creek can be crossed on the east end of the ranch via a well-constructed concrete three culvert crossing.Airports: There are two airports in close proximity Lake Creek Ranch. Waco Regional Airport (ACT) is a full service airport located 5+/- miles NW of Waco and 22+/- miles from the ranch. It is a Class 1 Airport averaging 98 aircraft per day with two (2) runways measuring 6,596' and 5,896'. Additionally, TSTC Waco Airport (CNW) is located 8+/- miles NE of Waco and 15+/- from the ranch. The airport averages 131 aircraft per day with two (2) runways measuring 8,600' and 6,291'. Former President George W. Bush landed Air Force One at TSTC when visiting their family ranch during his presidency.Hospitals: There are three full service hospitals located in close proximity to the ranch. Hill Regional Hospital, Providence Health Center, Hillcrest Baptist Medical Center all located in and around Waco, Texas.School District: Riesel ISDElectricity: Oncor Electric, and Navasota Valley Co-opMinerals: Minerals are negotiable. Owner is believed to own a majority of the minerals on the ranch, but no warranties or guarantees will be made.Grazing Leases: The ranch is currently leased for grazing and hay production. Fishing and hunting have been prohibited during the current ownership.Taxes: Annual property taxes for 2015 were approximately $17,851.73 and the property is agricultural exemptLegal Description: Estimated ~1833.536+/- acres in which a plat map and legal description of the property resulting from a boundary survey conducted in 2013 can be made available to prequalified Buyers.Buyers & Brokers: Buyer's brokers must be present for all initial showings. Buyers should notify Listing Broker that they are represented prior to touring the property. We welcome the opportunity to work with other Brokers/ Agents, but expect their full participation in any transaction.Comments: Rare opportunity to own a massive private lake in the heart of Central Texas close to Waco, TX and three major metropolitan areas.Contact:Cash McWhorter - Partner/Broker, 469-222-4076 MobileBlake Hortenstine - Partner/Broker, 214-616-1305 Mobile
Hortenstine Ranch Company LLC

Cash McWhorter
10711 Preston Road, Suite 240
Dallas, TX 75230

Mobile: 469-222-4076